See the city on two wheels during annual Tour du Port

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October 21, 2006|By Liz Atwood | Liz Atwood,sun reporter

Tomorrow trade four wheels for two and head out to Baltimore's annual Tour du Port cycling event.

The tour offers eight-, 15- and 22-mile routes through six city neighborhoods.

"It's a great way to get out and see the city from a different perspective," said Stacy Mink, director of One Less Car, the event's sponsor.

On-site registration begins at 7 a.m. at Rash Field, and the tour begins at 7:30 a.m. Neighborhoods along the way are Federal Hill, Inner Harbor, Harbor East, Fells Point, Canton and Dundalk, before concluding at Fort McHenry.

"What we try to do is get people through the most scenic route and get every hill because people like hills," Mink said.

But Baltimore being mostly flat, the routes are easy enough for even novice bikers, she said. "Basically anybody can do these routes. Even if you haven't been on a bike in 10 years," she said.

Participation in the tour has grown since the first one was held 12 years ago. Mink said this week that 1,200 cyclists have registered so far and that she expects that number to grow to 1,500 on the day of the event.

Registration is $30 for adults, $20 for children younger than 13. All bicyclists are required to wear a helmet during the ride, and children younger than 18 must be accompanied by an adult.

One Less Car promotes safe cycling and walking in Maryland. For more information on the organization, call 410-235-3678 or go to onelesscar.org.

liz.atwood@baltsun.com

If you go

Parking is limited around Rash Field. Look for on-street parking or garages around the Inner Harbor and bike to Rash Field to begin the tour. What to bring:

Plenty of water or sports beverages.

A rain jacket. The tour goes on rain or shine.

A few snacks.

A basic bike repair kit.

Personal identification, and money for phone calls if you don't have a cell phone.

First aid supplies.

[ONE LESS CAR]

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