Poe's own tale of mystery, intrigue

Local Screenings

October 06, 2006|By CHRIS KALTENBACH

Baltimore writer-director Mark Redfield's The Death of Poe, a dramatization of the famed mystery writer's final days (he died in Baltimore, under circumstances still not fully explained, on Oct. 7, 1849), will have its world premiere Wednesday at The Charles, 1711 N. Charles St. Redfield plays Poe; others in the cast include Kevin G. Shinnick, Jennifer Rouse, Tony Tsendeas, Kim Hannold and J.R. Lyston. Tickets are $10. Information: 410-409-5465 or thedeathofpoe.com.

Focus on cinematography

Director Lodge Kerrigan and cinematographer John Foster will be on hand Monday night to discuss their 2004 film, Keane, the tale of a man who loses his daughter at New York's Port Authority Bus Terminal. The free screening, set for 7:30 p.m. at the Maryland Institute College of Art's Brown Center, 1301 Mount Royal Ave., is part of the Maryland Film Festival's "Focus on Cinematography" series, running Mondays through October. Information: 410-752-8083 or www.mdfilmfest.com.

City film industry discussion

"The Growth of the Film Industry in Baltimore" will be the subject of a free panel discussion set for 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, 1415 Key Highway. Participating in the discussion, part of the Free Fall Baltimore celebration, will be Jed Dietz of the Maryland Film Festival; Hannah Lee Byron of the Baltimore Film Office; Jack Gerbes of the Maryland Film Office; and local casting director Pat Moran. Information: 410-727-4808 or www.thebmi.org.

Rockin' at the Pratt

Elvis Presley's legendary 1968 television special, in which the king of rock 'n' roll reclaimed a crown many thought he didn't care about anymore, will be shown at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St., as part of its "Swingin' '60s Rock Flashbacks" series. The free showing is set for 6:30 p.m. in the library's Wheeler Auditorium. The series concludes next Wednesday with a series of "scopitones," 16 mm shorts shown on film jukeboxes in the mid-'60s and featuring such artists as Nancy Sinatra, Bobby Vee and Leslie Gore. Information: 410-396-4616 or www.epfl.net/events/adults.html#1672.

Viva Pedro!

The Charles Theatre's retrospective of the films of Spanish director Pedro Almodovar continues this week with 1997's Live Flesh and 1987's Law of Desire (through Monday), followed by 1986's Matador and 2004's Bad Education (Tuesday through Thursday). The Charles is at 1711 N. Charles St. Ticket information and showtimes: 410-727-FILM or thecharles.com.

Hispanic film celebration

Viva el Cine Latino!, a celebration of Hispanic film culture sponsored by the Governor's Commission on Hispanic Affairs, continues Wednesday with Spanish director Iciar Bollain's 1999 Flores de Otro Mundo, a drama centering on two immigrant couples who settle in Spain hoping for a better life but find things not nearly as rosy as they had hoped. Showtime is 7 p.m. at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. Tickets are $6, $5 for alliance and Baltimore Museum of Art members. Information: 410-276-1651 or creativealliance.org.

Cinema Sundays at the Charles

Infamous, the second film in 12 months dealing with author Truman Capote and the work he did in preparation for writing In Cold Blood, is this weekend's scheduled Cinema Sundays at the Charles offering. Both it and last year's Capote, which covers much of the same material and won actor Philip Seymour Hoffman an Oscar, were in production almost simultaneously. Written and directed by Douglas McGrath (Nicholas Nickleby) and based on a book by George Plimpton, the film stars Toby Jones as Capote and Sandra Bullock as his longtime friend, To Kill a Mockingbird writer Harper Lee. Showtime at The Charles, 1711 N. Charles St., is 10:30 a.m. Sunday, preceded by 45 minutes of no-extra-charge coffee and bagels. Tickets: $15. Information: 410-727-FILM or cinemasundays.com.

chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com

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