Critic's choice

Critic's choice

September 08, 2006|By Glenn McNatt

Pissarro at the BMA

In one critical decade, Camille Pissarro helped invent the lusciously atmospheric images that have made Impressionism the world's most recognizable painting style.

The Baltimore Museum of Art's Pissarro: Creating the Impressionist Landscape is a major exhibition of about 50 paintings that span the mid-1860s and 1870s. A mentor to a younger generation that included Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley and Paul Cezanne, Pissarro was a leader of the movement and a pivotal figure among 19th-century painters in France.

"Pissarro worked closely with both Monet and Cezanne, and during his lifetime he was considered by some to [have been] as innovative as they," says Katy Rothkopf, curator of European painting and sculpture at the BMA, of the specially ticketed exhibition. "The show begins with Pissarro's first [exhibition at the official French] Salon in the 1860s and ends with his entries to the first Impressionist show in 1874."

Pissarro: Creating the Impressionist Landscape opens Feb. 11 and runs through May 13 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Information: 443-573-1700 or artbma.org.

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