Letters

August 26, 2006

Ravens unworthy of benefit of doubt

Tuesday's Sports section led with the headline: "Unofficial targets?" The article following rhetorically asked whether the Ravens are assessed more penalties than deserved.

The answer is probably yes, but it's easy to see why.

Much like a pitcher who has been consistently wild throughout his stint in a baseball game is not given the benefit of the doubt on close calls, the same may be true of the Ravens.

Any team that celebrates the most routine play as if it were the Second Coming deserves a torrent of flags.

The Ravens' condoning of this classless behavior has reached its zenith - or nadir - with their current TV promotional spot aimed at kids. It features a montage of players essentially behaving like jerks.

When referees of youth football leagues saw these spots, they must have come to dread the start of their seasons. The thought of kids following the lead of their Ravens role models and showing up their opponents by flapping their arms like some deranged thug after a tackle is not a pleasant one.

In other words, more class will equal fewer penalties for the Ravens.

Joe Roman

Baltimore

American flag not just for Ravens

On Aug. 17 at the Ravens-Eagles game, the Ravens may have played well on the field but the people responsible for the pre-game show should be ashamed of the revolting use of the American flag.

The show included three color guards and the band spelling out USA on the field. After this patriotic display, the Ravens used the American flag to wave in front of their players as they entered the field to begin the game.

The American flag is not a Ravens prop. After it was treated with respect, the Ravens tried to diminish it by appropriating it for their team. This is wrong.

Leave the American flag flying over the stadium or with the color guards. Don't use it as a prop to wave in front of any single team.

The American flag belongs to everyone in the stadium.

Kim Bruno

Washington

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