Jeter adds aroma to his aura

The Kickoff

August 02, 2006|By PETER SCHMUCK

I guess you could call it the sweet smell of success.

New York Yankees star Derek Jeter just signed a contract with Avon to market his own line of male grooming products, starting with a new cologne called "Driven."

I'm in favor of anything that will make Yankees fans smell better, so this is terrific news, especially for any normal human who has ever made the mistake of sitting in the right-field bleachers at Yankee Stadium. Now, the guy in the tank top shirt in the seat next to you won't be stinking drunk. He'll just be drunk. I consider that progress.

Jeter's an excellent choice. He's a classy guy with lots of money. He once even romanced Mariah Carey, back when she was prettier than him. There's a rumor they offered the same deal to Alex Rodriguez, but his image is so squeaky clean that he didn't want to give the impression that he needs anything to freshen up.

I particularly like the name of the new scent, which - according to the Associated Press, which wouldn't lie about this sort of thing - was formulated to reflect the "unique personality of one of the most driven men in America." Maybe I shouldn't be telling you this, but Avon also contacted me with a similar deal, but I balked when they wanted to call my new cologne "Drivel."

The highlight of my weekend in Cooperstown was the moment in Buck O'Neil's opening speech when he asked everyone in attendance to join hands. I got to hold hands with Hall of Famer Tom Seaver. Does that mean we're engaged?

Baseball commissioner Bud Selig told me Sunday that next year's Hall of Fame induction ceremony could be the biggest ever held at the Clark Sports Center.

"And we've had some big ones," Selig said. "Remember when Nolan Ryan, George Brett and Robin Yount went in? But people here have told me that next year could be the biggest."

It's no wonder. Cal Ripken and Tony Gwynn, two of the most popular players of their generation, are locks to be elected when the 2007 ballots go out in December. Hall of Fame officials are expecting a particularly large influx of fans from Baltimore, but Ripken's link to Yankees great Lou Gehrig also should bring in a lot of fans from the New York area.

Since yesterday was the hottest day of the year, I thought it was only logical to spend the afternoon playing golf. Actually, I had agreed in advance to take part in the media day for next month's Constellation Energy Classic - the Champions Tour event at Hayfields Country Club.

Guess I don't have to tell you it was a steam bath ... or that I racked up a double-digit score on one of the par-fives ... or that they made me carry a defibrillator around with me in my cart again this year.

There were a number of wimpy no-shows because of the heat. WBFF sports anchor Bruce Cunningham backed out for fear his hair would collapse and there would be no one around from FEMA to provide assistance.

Arnold Palmer took part in yesterday's CEC media conference by telephone, telling the local media that he hopes to take his game to a higher level for what may be his only tournament appearance of the year.

"I can't wait to get there and have some of that great seafood in Bal-tee-more," Palmer said.

The last time Palmer was in Baltimore was for a CEC media conference earlier this year at McCormick & Schmick's which apparently made quite an impression.

The Mid-Atlantic Sports Network announced yesterday that it had signed an exclusive deal with the Ravens to broadcast four preseason games and significant primetime programming.

This not just in: In a related development, Comcast announced that it is seeking part ownership of the Ravens in exchange for airing the new football lineup.

This week's funny headline from SportsPickle.com, the Maryland-based humor and satire site on the Web: Yankees say A-Rod trade reports unfortunately not true.

peter.schmuck@baltsun.com

"The Peter Schmuck Show" airs on WBAL (1090 AM) at noon on Saturdays.

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