Bread is just a shell for this tasty filling

Try This at Home

July 23, 2006|By MARGE PERRY | MARGE PERRY,NEWSDAY

This sandwich is more than just ingredients between two slices of bread: The muffaletta is actually a hollowed-out bread filled with layers of cooked chicken breast, roast beef and olive salad. Make this at least 30 minutes ahead of time: The flavors meld and blossom as it sits.

CHICKEN MUFFALETTA

Makes 2 servings

1/3 cup drained chopped green stuffed olives

3 canned artichoke hearts, drained and chopped

2 bottled roasted red peppers, drained and chopped

2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

1 small clove garlic, minced

1 tablespoon drained capers

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 round (8-ounce) sourdough bread

4 ounces provolone, thinly sliced

10 ounces cooked chicken breast, in bite-sized pieces

6 ounces deli-sliced roast beef

1 cup mixed baby greens

Combine the olives, artichokes, roasted peppers, basil, garlic, capers, vinegar and oil in a bowl.

Horizontally slice off the top third of the bread and set aside. Pull out the soft bread inside, leaving a 1/2-inch shell all around the bottom and sides; discard the removed bread. Hollow out the top of the bread in the same manner.

Spread half of the olive mixture along the bottom of the breads and top with half the cheese. Add chicken, roast beef, lettuce and remaining cheese. Top with the remaining olives; replace the tops of the bread to close the sandwich. Wrap the bread tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes to overnight. Cut the bread in 4 wedges to serve.

Per serving: 480 calories, 43 grams protein,36 grams carbohydrates, 2 grams fiber, 17 grams fat, 6 grams saturated fat, 95 milligrams cholesterol, 1,242 milligrams sodium (Note: sodium can be reduced by thoroughly rinsing canned artichokes and bottled peppers and using reduced-sodium cheese.)

Marge Perry writes for Newsday, which provided the recipe and analysis.

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