Letters

LETTERS

July 22, 2006

Orioles' ushers toe harsh company line

At the Orioles' July 14 game against the Texas Rangers, the announced attendance was 28,201 in a ballpark that seats 48,290.

As five friends and I attempted to sit together in seats that were not ours, we were told by 11 separate ushers that club policy strictly forbids individuals from sitting in seats that do not match purchased tickets.

Having lived in Pittsburgh and Chicago, I understand the pain and frustration of supporting terrible baseball teams. But the ushers at Three Rivers Stadium, PNC Park and Wrigley Field (not to mention those at every other stadium I have ever visited) have never so stubbornly and rudely refused to allow fans to sit in clearly unoccupied seats in a stadium that is half full.

I imagine the Orioles' brass wants the season-ticket holders to feel secure in the knowledge that their unattended seats are not being filled with vagrants.

It's sad to realize that the owner's bitter, whiny, litigious and manipulative ways have infected the ballpark staff as well. At least I have comfort in knowing that revenue and attendance are down for moribund and pathetic teams like the Orioles.

Justin Conroy

Baltimore

Landis' mother sets fine example

What a wonderful story about Floyd Landis, a Mennonite from Farmersville, Pa., and his attempt to win the Tour de France ["A road less traveled," Sunday].

Despite a bum hip, Landis plugs along and remains competitive.

But even more impressive than Landis' drive and desire to win is something his mother said about the Mennonite life after visiting a non-Mennonite and sneaking a peek at her son on television.

She said: "Even when I'm watching [the Tour de France], I see some of these beer advertisements, and I'm just shocked. It really undermines true family values, I think. Plus, without TV, we have so much more time for each other."

Truer words were never spoken.

David Boyd

White Hall

Wie should prove worth vs. women

I have a question concerning Michelle Wie.

Would she have quit at the PGA's John Deere Classic after nine holes if her score was 8-under instead of 8-over?

She is a great 16-year-old golfer who has proved she cannot compete with the men. She needs to first prove she can win with the women!

The PGA is using her to help draw crowds for tournaments that have no name players and need help to draw interest.

Shame on the PGA.

John Clarke Sr.

Bradenton, Fla.

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