David Hyde LaMotte, 75, minister

July 03, 2006

The Rev. David Hyde LaMotte, a production manager for the family-owned LaMotte Chemical in Chesterstown who became an Episcopal rector, died of complications from leukemia June 24 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Worton resident was 75.

Born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, Mr. LaMotte graduated from St. Paul's School in 1948. He attended the University of Virginia until 1952, when he joined the Army during the Korean War.

He served with the transportation corps and was honorably discharged in 1954, having attained the rank of second lieutenant.

In 1952, Mr. LaMotte married Elizabeth Collins of Charleston, W.Va.

After serving in the military, he began working at LaMotte Chemical, which was based in Towson and later moved to Chestertown.

In 1962, Mr. LaMotte entered the Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Va. He was ordained a minister in 1965 and was assigned to work with the Episcopal parishes of St. Clement's Episcopal Church in Massey and Holy Cross Chapel in Millington.

He became the rector at St. John's Episcopal Church in Portsmouth, Va., in 1967. He returned to Kent County in 1981 to be rector of Old St. Paul's Parish near Chestertown.

Mr. LaMotte retired in 1992 but continued to conduct services as a supply priest at Episcopal churches in the Diocese of Easton.

He was a member of the International Association for Near-Death Studies, a subject that he taught at Washington College's Academy of Lifelong Learning in Chestertown.

He enjoyed organic gardening, bird-watching, kayaking and sailing.

Services were held Thursday at Shrewsbury Parish in Kennedyville.

In addition to his wife of 54 years, Mr. LaMotte is survived by two sons, David Hyde LaMotte Jr. and Richard Harrison LaMotte, both of Chestertown; a daughter, Susan LaMotte Bohaker of Easton; a sister, Eleanor LaMotte Trippe of Easton; a brother, Charles V.B. LaMotte of Ponte Vedra, Fla.; five grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

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