Howard High sophomore selected to represent Md. at leadership conference

EDUCATION NOTEBOOK

July 02, 2006|By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV

Anyone who meets Chelsea Everett, a 16-year-old sophomore at Howard High School, knows she is a natural leader.

She is personable, loves to talk, and is very enthusiastic.

She is also involved in her school. She was recently elected president of the junior class for the coming year, after serving in the same capacity for the sophomore class. She is a member of her school's step team, a member of the spirit squad and a member of the track-and-field team.

No wonder the Columbia resident recently was selected to represent the state July 27 through Aug. 4 at the World Leadership Conference at George Washington University in Washington.

"I hope to get more techniques and bring back ways to get more people involved in my school and my community," she said.

The conference, which has been held every year since 1968, is a gathering of youth leaders from around the world who have been nominated and have advanced from the local level. The conference is affiliated with the Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership Program, which has been around for 50 years.

"I was really shocked, excited," Everett said Thursday afternoon, as she headed to her summer job as a customer service specialist at Best Buy. "It is going to be a great experience."

Her mother, Amanda Everett, said her daughter is a hard worker.

"She's a kid who is motivated," her mother said. "She's a take-charge person. She's a great team player. But she's also independent and a self-starter."

Grant for Cedar Lane

Cedar Lane School has received a $15,000 grant from the Boeing Co. that will allow 92 employees to attend workshops on how to work with children with severe disabilities.

The money is the latest contribution from Boeing, which has given the school $45,000 over the past three years.

"It has kept staff abreast on best and promising practices in the field," said Principal Nicholas Girardi. "It has helped us with staff training, improving teacher skills."

Grant money has been used to send staff members to conferences and training in Maryland, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Returning staff members make presentations to the rest of the Cedar Lane staff, Girardi said.

Scholarships

Republican Del. Gail H. Bates recently announced that she awarded $58,000 in scholarship money this year to 68 students from her voting district in western Howard County. Twenty-five of the students attended Howard County schools this past school year.

Centennial High School seniors receiving scholarships included: Mitchell Amoros, Michael Cascio, Jonathan Choi, Lindsay Giffin, Isaac Kim, Joshua Michael, Haneefa Muhammad and Dylan Podson.

Glenelg High School seniors included Jeffrey Garonzik, Andrew Gotschall, Mary Kasda, Michelle Lacey, Daniel Pindell, Alyssa Siebert, Patrick Silas, Catherine Valavanis and Dianna Watson.

Howard High School seniors included William Bell, Matthew Duerr, Jordan Estes and Christopher Moore.

River Hill High School seniors included Erin Good, Mark Mantua, and Yasamin Moghadam.

Christopher Rodkey of Mount Hebron, also received a scholarship.

The remaining scholarship money went to college students and students attending schools outside Howard County.

The scholarships, which ranged from $250 to $1,500, were awarded to graduating seniors and current college students, based on leadership, community service, extracurricular activities, academic achievement and work ethic.

Bates has distributed more than $150,000 in scholarship money to students in her district during the past five years. The money comes from the Maryland Higher Education Commission.

"These students are not only at the top of their classes academically, they are also leaders in their schools and in their communities. Their high level of achievement gives me great hope for this generation of college students and for the future of Maryland," Bates said in a news release.

john-john.williams@baltsun.com

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