Sun wins 15 Associated Press awards

June 30, 2006|By NICK MADIGAN | NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER

The Sun won 15 awards yesterday from the Associated Press for work published last year in the Chesapeake region, which covers Maryland, Delaware and Washington.

The wire service's annual contest drew 344 entries. They were judged by newspaper editors in New Mexico, who awarded 93 prizes in 27 categories.

The Sun, which competes among daily papers with circulations of more than 75,000, won the top prize for a news series with "A Failure to Protect," by Jonathan D. Rockoff and John O'Donnell, about children in group homes. The feature-series category was won by Liz Bowie for "On Their Own," about a pair of homeless high-school seniors.

The paper won also for local state government coverage, with "Port Security," by Michael Dresser and Greg Barrett, and for investigative reporting, with "Masking Malpractice Cases," by Fred Schulte.

Sun photographer Amy Davis picked up three prizes. A picture of an errant bison on a tennis court in April 2005 won the Rob Award, named after the late Pulitzer Prize-winning AP photographer Roberto Borea, and the prize for best feature picture. Davis also won for a spot news picture titled "Inaugural Protest."

Other awards for The Sun were for:

Health story: "Stanching Wounds," by Robert Little.

Business story: "Real Estate's Rising Tide," by Jamie Smith Hopkins.

Column: "NFL's Neglect of Mackey Belongs in Hall of Shame," by Rick Maese.

Page One design: "Pope John Paul II Dies," by Michelle Deal-Zimmerman.

Freedom of information: "B.D.C.," by Jill Rosen.

Public service columns: Dan Rodricks.

Sports picture: "Triple Header," by Gene Sweeney Jr.

Sports photo story: "High-Kicking Goal," Monica Lopossay.

Among other winners, The News Journal of Wilmington, Del. won nine awards, The Frederick News-Post took home 12 awards, and The Herald-Mail, published in Hagerstown, took six.

nick.madigan@baltsun.com

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