Terps' McPhearson takes speed to Giants in Round 7

May 01, 2006|By BILL FREE | BILL FREE,SUN REPORTER

Cornerback Gerrick McPhearson is billed as the fastest player in the history of Maryland football.

Yesterday, he more than lived up to that tag after being taken in the seventh round of the NFL draft by the New York Giants. The 5-foot-10, 194-pound player from Howard High and Cardinal Gibbons even outran his media coverage.

He couldn't be reached through his agent's Chicago office, his home phone number was unlisted, and his Howard High coach (Vince Parnell) didn't know where McPhearson was.

"He's probably out celebrating," Parnell said of the only Maryland and Baltimore-area player selected yesterday in the fourth through seventh rounds. McPhearson was the 24th player chosen in the seventh round and the 232nd overall pick of a total of 255 players taken.

"I saw him around the holidays and he expected to be drafted," said Parnell of the Maryland record holder in the 60-meter dash (6.73) and the 40 (4.21).

"He was probably the strongest defensive back when he walked into Maryland," Parnell said. "He has explosive speed and is a fast closer. I thought he would go higher honestly. We got some questionnaires from the Oakland Raiders and the Packers, so he was obviously on somebody's list."

Parnell said one of the more impressive things about McPhearson was that he came back to Maryland for a fifth year even though he had already received his degree in May of 2005.

"He's a very likable, intelligent young man with an engaging smile and nice personality," the coach said. "He's from a football family. His father [Gerrick Sr.] had a tryout with the Patriots."

McPhearson played just one year at Howard after transferring from Gibbons and overcame some early shoulder problems at Maryland. NFL scouts love his speed but cooled on him because they felt he didn't fulfill his potential in his senior season.

bfree7066@hotmail.com

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.