Comets in command

Kolarek stops No. 7 Dulaney as No. 5 Catonsville triumphs, 9-3

High schools

Baseball

March 28, 2006|By PAT O'MALLEY | PAT O'MALLEY,SUN REPORTER

Junior left-hander Adam Kolarek had superb command throwing the baseball for Catonsville yesterday while visiting Dulaney couldn't find the handle on its catching or throwing in a 9-3 loss to the Comets in Baltimore County baseball.

The No. 7-ranked Lions committed seven errors as the No. 5 Comets (2-1) took advantage to stake Kolarek to an 8-0 lead through the five shutout innings he worked.

Bill Sipes pitched the last two innings for the Comets of coach Rich Hambor. Kolarek gave up only one hit, a leadoff single to Alex Frederick to start the game, struck out six and walked three on 81 pitches. He has both Comets wins, the other coming in relief on Friday by 2-1 over No. 10 Eastern Tech.

"I was pretty much a reliever last year and had three saves," said Kolarek, who is the son of former University of Maryland and minor league catcher Frank Kolarek.

"I like starting because I like the mind process, the game inside the game. My dad didn't want me to be a catcher and I'm a natural lefty, which made it easy."

Kolarek, who also had three hits yesterday and plays center field when he's not on the mound, has only been pitching about three years. That makes his command of three pitches - fastball, forkball and changeup - all the more remarkable.

"I couldn't tell what he was throwing," said Al Bumbry, the Dulaney coach and Orioles Hall of Famer.

"His [Kolarek's] control was very good, and we had problems fielding. But I blame the field for a lot of our trouble defensively. I'm amazed at the poor conditions of some of these fields in Baltimore County."

It didn't help the Lions that their regular shortstop, junior Brent Russo, is injured. His return will solidify their infield, which victimized starter and loser Rich McWilliams yesterday.

patomalleysports@aol.com

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