Controlling bamboo with chemicals

GARDEN Q&A

Garden Q&A

March 25, 2006|By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI | JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

My problem is bamboo running amuck for 20 years. it has totally grown into all my large azalea bushes, etc. any solution to removing bamboo without digging up the bushes?

Running bamboo is extremely difficult to control and should probably never be planted in a residential landscape except in a container. continuous cutting weakens the plant but isn't satisfactory.

Chemical control is possible with persistence. Cut canes to the ground now. Let new foliage grow over the summer. Then apply a herbicide containing glyphosate or triclopyr in October, a time when nutrients are being moved to the roots for winter and herbicides absorb most readily. Both products are non-selective and kill any plant they contact. Shield your azaleas with cardboard or plastic as you spray, or apply herbicide with a paint brush or wick applicator. Get our publication Bamboo online or by calling us. What is treated seed? I want to switch to an organic garden. The term "treated" can refer to a number of different treatments. Innoculating a legume seed with Rhizobium bacteria or sterilizing seed in a hot water dip are both acceptable treatments under the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Organic Program standards. In the commercial seed trade, "treated" usually means coated with a chemical fungicide (typically thiram or captan) to protect the seed from diseases. By law, treated seeds are required to be dyed to distinguish them. Untreated seed is not necessarily organically grown seed and most organic gardeners are satisfied with untreated seed.

Checklist

Start plants of Chinese cabbage, leeks, beets, kale, mustard, lettuce, spinach and turnips indoors under shop lights with cool white fluorescent tubes -- or plant seeds directly in fertile garden soil.

Jon Traunfeld, regional specialist, and Ellen Nibali, horticulture consultant, work at Maryland Cooperative Extension's Home and Garden Information Center, which offers Maryland residents free gardening information. Call the center's "hotline" at 800-342-2507 (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.) or e-mail plant and pest questions through the Send a Question feature at hgic.umd.edu.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.