Louise V. Allen, 84, city Board of Elections supervisor

March 22, 2006

Louise V. Allen, a former supervisor for the Baltimore City Board of Elections, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Saturday at Summit Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Catonsville. The Edmondson Village resident was 84.

She was born Louise Virginia Rice in Chesnee, S.C., and moved to Baltimore in 1937.

Mrs. Allen attended night school at Douglass High School where she earned her General Education Development diploma and was a graduate of the Cortez Peters Business School. She also studied at what is now Morgan State University.

During the 1960s, she worked as a seamstress at Crown Cleaners. From 1976 until retiring in 1987, she was a supervisor with the city Board of Elections.

Mrs. Allen was an avid bowler and world traveler and had visited Italy, Aruba and Hawaii.

She enjoyed cooking and entertaining. She was known for her hummingbird cake, made with crushed pineapple, bananas and cream cheese, family members said.

"At Christmastime, she made cookies and sold cakes," said a sister, Madge R. Cannon of Baltimore.

Since 1937, Mrs. Allen had been a member of Fulton Baptist Church, where she served as a deaconess and was a former president of the missionary society.

Services for Mrs. Allen will be held at 9:30 a.m. Monday at her church, 1630 W. North Ave.

Surviving are her husband of 14 years, William Allen; four daughters, Harriett Farr of Philadelphia, Betty Gach of Randallstown, Joyce Ann Gillard and Valerie Farr, both of Baltimore; two stepsons, Mark Allen and Milo Allen, both of Baltimore; two stepdaughters, Maria Tolson Allen and Renee Allen, both of Baltimore; three other sisters, Elizabeth Goins of Baltimore, Dorothy Geneva Harvey of Lochearn and Shirley Ann Cooper of Pikesville; six grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

Her first husband, Willie B. Farr, died in 1975; and her second husband, William Johnson, died in 1986.

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