Leftover duck makes quick, savory hash

DINNER TONIGHT

March 22, 2006|By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX | CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE

My favorite slow-cooked dish this season is braised duck legs. Simmered in red wine and seasonings, the duck becomes so tender, it easily shreds from the bone.

If you are one of those who resists duck because of fat, you only need to chill the dish a bit to bring the fat to the surface of the stew to be removed. Reheat, and it's a perfect, almost-lean Sunday supper.

But during the week, when time is short, use some of the leftover duck and a little of its sauce to make this almost-as-good duck hash with fennel and potato. A little dicing, a little sauteing, then tossing together a salad -- dinner's done.

Duck Hash With Fennel and Potato

Serves 4 -- Total time: 40 minutes

2 tablespoons butter

1 small red onion, chopped

1 small fennel bulb without the stems, chopped

4 red potatoes, unpeeled, chopped

1 teaspoon hot or sweet paprika

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1/2 cup white wine or chicken broth

3 cooked duck legs, meat removed and chopped

Heat butter in large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and fennel; cook, stirring often, 5 minutes. Add potatoes, paprika, salt and pepper; cook, stirring often, until potatoes are lightly browned, 5 to 8 minutes.

Stir in wine; cook over high heat, stirring often, until wine is absorbed, 5 minutes. Stir in duck; cook, pressing down with spatula, until mixture is lightly browned on bottom, 5 minutes.

Per serving: 258 calories, 8 grams fat, 4 grams saturated fat, 51 milligrams cholesterol, 34 grams carbohydrate, 14 grams protein, 405 milligrams sodium, 5 grams fiber

Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe and analysis.

Menu suggestion

Duck Hash With Fennel and Potato

Radicchio and bibb lettuce salad

French bread

Bakery mini-lemon tarts

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.