Daisy Marie Bellamy, 41, Army sergeant, saleswoman

December 18, 2005|By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER

Daisy Marie Bellamy, a retired sergeant with the Army who served in the Gulf War, died Tuesday after a four-year battle with breast cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 41.

Born and raised in South Baltimore, Ms. Bellamy received a General Educational Development diploma from a community college in 1981 after attending Edmondson High School. She then joined the military.

"She loved the Army," said her mother, Sarah Canty of Baltimore. "She was watching a commercial one day and said, `That's what I want to be.'"

Ms. Bellamy served for 20 years, much of it in the reserves. She served in the Gulf War in the early 1990s and was stationed in Saudi Arabia. While overseas, she worked in transportation and as a medical specialist. She received a medical discharge from the Army Reserve in June because of her illness.

For the past six years, Ms. Bellamy worked as a saleswoman at Koons Ford on Security Boulevard.

"She loved people," said Mrs. Canty, who lived with her daughter. "Daisy would give you a good deal."

Mrs. Canty recalled the story of her daughter co-signing for a woman who needed to purchase a van.

Chrysantus Atanga, who worked with Ms. Bellamy for five years at Koons Ford, said he was impressed with her hard work, courage and religious faith.

"I was here three years before knowing that she was sick," Mr. Atanga said. "She was not afraid that she was sick."

Ms. Bellamy was one of the top salespeople at the dealership and for many years was the only saleswoman, said Mr. Atanga.

"She worked as hard or harder than the men," Mr. Atanga said.

"She never took no for an answer," he said. "I learned a lot from her. She would try as much as possible that everything was done so that she could get the customer in the car. She was one of those people who would take care of her customers."

Between customers, Ms. Bellamy would talk to co-workers about the Bible and her faith.

"The only thing that kept her going was her faith in God," Mr. Atanga said.

Mrs. Canty said her daughter once gave a friend $1,700 so that he could keep his house.

"When he tried to repay her she said, `You keep it. God will give it to me in another way,'" Mrs. Canty said. "She helped people without expecting anything in return.

"Daisy would never tell me the name of the person she helped," Mrs. Canty explained. "She would say, `That is between me and Jesus.' She was loving, kind and generous."

Ms. Bellamy was a deacon at the House of Refuge International Church in Baltimore.

A funeral will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Shiloh United Apostolic Church, 2000 Druid Park Drive.

In addition to her mother, Ms. Bellamy is survived by a daughter, DeVene' M. Bellamy; a sister, Yolanda K. Bellamy; and her grandmother, Sarah C. Bellamy. All are of Baltimore.

john-john.williams@baltsun.com

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