The Week That Was

Bltimore & region

December 04, 2005

Bush speaks at Naval Academy

President Bush declared he had a clear strategy for victory in Iraq, seeking to quiet calls for a U.S. withdrawal with a speech at the Naval Academy that drew harsh attacks from critics who said he had offered no new details.

Marine from Hampstead dies in Iraq

Marine Cpl. Joshua D. Snyder of Hampstead died of wounds from small-arms fire in Fallujah, the second graduate of Hereford High School to die in Iraq in five weeks.

Overtime costs could double

Baltimore is on pace to spend twice as much on employee overtime as planned, largely because of expanded police work. Mayor Martin O'Malley said overtime might be less expensive than more hiring, but City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. called it "ludicrous and irresponsible."

Ads aim to save inmate's life

Claiming Maryland's death penalty is unfairly skewed by race and geography, a new ad campaign called upon Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to commute the sentence of death row inmate Wesley Eugene Baker, who is scheduled to be executed for the fatal shooting of a woman in Baltimore in 1991.

Possible O'Malley running mate

Mayor Martin O'Malley is in negotiations with Del. Anthony G. Brown, an African-American lawyer who served in Iraq, about becoming his running mate in the governor's race, a source close to the Prince George's County Democrat said.

Hickey youths wait in jail

As Maryland prepared to close most of the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, it developed a backlog of young offenders being held for weeks in juvenile jails while officials struggle to find places to put them. An Eastern Shore center for juvenile offenders, saying it is already crowded, protested the state's decision to send it youths from Hickey.

Fire recovery plan is set up

Annapolis officials announced an aggressive rebuilding schedule after a five-alarm fire. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer set a May target for most of the work to be done.

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