Line baking pans with wax paper

Burning Questions

November 23, 2005|By ERICA MARCUS | ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY

Can I use wax paper instead of parchment paper when baking?

Wax paper is paper that has been impregnated and coated with food-grade paraffin to make it stronger and more moisture-resistant than untreated paper.

The Web site of Reynolds Consumer Products, maker of Cut-Rite wax paper, states that wax paper can be used in the oven as long as it never is exposed directly to heat. This means you can use it to line pans when you are baking cakes, brownies or muffins. For cookies, or anything else where the paper will be exposed to direct heat, you will need to use parchment paper.

According to the site, reynoldskitchens.com, when you line cake pans with wax paper, there is no need to grease and flour the pans. "Place each cake pan on wax paper, trace around bottom, cut out a wax paper circle and drop it into the pan. After baking and cooling, loosen sides of cake with a knife. Invert cake onto a cooling rack. Remove pan and peel off wax paper for a smooth surface that's ready to frost."

Another tidbit from the Reynolds site: "Thomas Edison is given credit for inventing wax paper."

Erica Marcus writes for Newsday. E-mail your queries to burningquestions@newsday.com, or send them to Erica Marcus, Food/Part 2, Newsday, 235 Pinelawn Road, Melville, NY 11747-4250.

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