Southside bumped in 1A semifinal

Volleyball

High schools

November 17, 2005|By KATHERINE DUNN | KATHERINE DUNN,SUN REPORTER

COLLEGE PARK -- Southside's Tamara Trusty was thinking about just one thing after last night's state Class 1A volleyball semifinal at Ritchie Coliseum: "I want to come back here again."

In their first trip to the state semifinals, the Jaguars were overmatched by Poolesville, which pounded out a 25-10, 25-11, 25-18 victory behind power-hitting Inge Rasmussen (14 kills) and Jessica Chittenden (seven kills).

The Jaguars (10-7) struggled through the first 2 1/2 games before putting up a fight late in the third. Poolesville's Annie Serak served 14 straight points to open the third game, but the Jaguars eventually pulled within 19-14 as they played solid defense and took advantage of Falcons mistakes when Poolesville dipped into its bench.

"In the third game, we did a lot better," said Trusty, one of four Jaguars with Starlings Volleyball Club experience. "I guess they figured, `It's the last game and we've got to work harder. We could still do this.' At that point, I think it was a little too late. We should have started that in the first game."

The Jaguars were much better defensively than offensively. They totaled seven kills - four from Brittney Davis - but the Falcons had 26 kills.

Still, coach Dana Johnson's Jaguars were only the second Baltimore City team to reach the state volleyball final four. Western has been three times, most recently in 2001.

In the title match, the Falcons (15-2) will meet three-time defending champion Williamsport tomorrow night at 6:30 at Ritchie Coliseum.

Williamsport 3, Rising Sun 1 -- Sammi Snodderly had 17 kills to lead the Washington County powerhouse to a 25-12, 25-23, 21-25, 25-22 victory over Rising Sun (14-4). The Wildcats (15-3) have won 11 state titles, more than any other team in state tournament history. Centennial is second with 10.

katherine.dunn@baltsun.com

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