Saute gets a flavorful assist from apricots

DINNER TONIGHT

November 09, 2005|By RENEE ENNA | RENEE ENNA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Maybe you haven't noticed, but the dried-fruit aisle is getting bigger. These intensely flavored morsels are worth exploring in sauteed dishes. They're packed with flavor and lend punch to entrees. They're typically high in calories but a little goes a long way. Here, dried apricots and walnuts perk up a quick chicken saute.

Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune.

Dried-and-True Apricot Chicken With Rice

4 servings -- Preparation time: 20 minutes -- Cooking time: 15 minutes

1 cup coarsely chopped dried apricots

1 package (8.8 ounces) ready-cook microwaveable brown rice

1 tablespoon vegetable or olive oil

1 onion, minced

3 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, cut into medium chunks

1/3 cup chopped walnuts

2 tablespoons honey

1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint

Cover the apricots with boiling water in a small bowl; set aside to plump. Cook the rice according to package directions. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion; cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the chicken; cook, stirring, until browned, about 5 minutes.

Add the apricots with their liquid, walnuts, honey, salt, cinnamon and pepper to taste. Cook until chicken is finished cooking and ingredients are heated through, about 5 to 7 minutes. Divide the rice among 4 plates. Top with chicken-apricot mixture; divide mint among each serving.

Per serving: 559 calories; 13 grams fat; 2 grams saturated fat; 55 milligrams cholesterol; 83 grams carbohydrate; 29 grams protein; 346 milligrams sodium; 7 grams fiber

Recipe and analysis from the Chicago Tribune

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