Our picks for weekend ideas that can't miss

Go For It

November 05, 2005

Go See

Mirrormask -- The creators of the classic Sandman graphic novels team with the Jim Henson company to produce a lyrical, transporting fantasia about a girl who wants to run away from the circus - and winds up in a magical netherworld where she proves her mettle. Sun score: A-.

Shopgirl -- Claire Danes is heartbreakingly vulnerable as a young woman looking for someone to love her for who she is in this adaptation of Steve Martin's novel. Martin also stars, along with Jason Schwartzman, as diametrically opposed suitors. There's a central dishonesty to the film that undermines its effectiveness, but the acting is first-rate. Sun score: B

To read Sun movie reviews: baltimoresun.com/movie

Go Show

Evita -- Even today, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice's Evita continues to serve as a frighteningly timely reminder of the ways crafty politicians can manipulate the masses. At the Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St., at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. tomorrow. $24-$64. Call 410-547-SEAT.

The House of Blue Leaves -- Set in 1965 Queens, N.Y., on the day of Pope Paul VI's visit, John Guare's 1971 play is about thwarted dreams. Through Nov. 20 at Fells Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St. 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. $12-$14. Call 410-276-7837.

To read Sun stage reviews: baltimoresun.com/stage

Go Rent

Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith -- The whole saga is now out on DVD, and this final piece includes some captivating bonus features, including "Within a Minute," a documentary showing all the steps in the production of one minute of the final light-saber battle.

Millions -- Trainspotting and 28 Days director Danny Boyle turns heartwarming in this tale of two boys who accidentally become the recipients of a cache of stolen British pounds the week before Britain is to switch to the euro.

Go Read

Life Interrupted -- Spalding Gray, the neurotically perceptive monologist who took his own life in 2004, was at work at the time on a new piece about his hospital stay after his terrifying 2001 automobile accident. A year after his death, this book produces that work as a short story as well as eulogies from many of his accomplished friends.

Team of Rivals -- The amiable popular historian Doris Kearns Goodwin is back with her first major work since her reputation was tarnished by an accusation of plagiarism. Here she explores how Abraham Lincoln deftly incorporated former rivals into his remarkable Cabinet.

Read reviews of these and other new books tomorrow in The Sun's Ideas section.

Go Do

Book signing -- Marion Rodgers signs copies of her new book, H.L. Mencken: The American Iconoclast, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. today at Clayton Fine Books, 317 N. Charles St. Call 410-752-6800.

Turkey Trot Skate and Bike Contest -- Tomorrow, Carroll Park is home to Tony Hawk wannabes as skateboarding and biking contestants get two one-minute runs to show off their skills. On Bayard Street, off Washington Boulevard. Ages 7 and older can compete. Event begins at noon. Call 410-396-7900.

Go Away

Tall ship visit -- In Chestertown today and tomorrow, seven tall ships from across the Mid-Atlantic will be filling the town's harbor and wharfs, as part of the annual Downrigging Weekend. For a fee, visitors can also ride aboard the ships. Call 410-778-5954.

Opera broadcast -- The Washington National Opera will celebrate 50 years by giving a free screening of Porgy and Bess near the Capitol tomorrow. Screening at the National Mall at 2 p.m. Call 202-295-2400.

Go Hear

Jem -- Songstress Jem will perform songs from her album Finally Woken tomorrow night at 7:30 at the 9:30 Club, 815 V St. N.W. in Washington. Tickets are $20. Call 800-955-5566 or visit tickets.com.

Guster --Get ready for Guster tomorrow night at Sonar, with openers Matt Pond PA. Doors open at 7 p.m, 407 E. Saratoga St. $25. All ages welcome. Tickets available at ticketmaster.com or 410-547-SEAT. Visit sonarbaltimore.com.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.