Letters

LETTERS

October 15, 2005

Out-of-control Ravens are embarrassment

The conduct of the Ravens on Sunday against the Detroit Lions was disgraceful and an embarrassment to the city of Baltimore and should be an embarrassment to all those connected with the team.

Judging from newspaper and TV reports since, neither players nor coaches nor, for that matter, higher management and ownership feel any embarrassment.

This reaction is disappointing. However, the Ravens' conduct should come as no surprise. Several veterans and team leaders have shown by their actions that they have no respect for authority or, in too many cases, the law.

Given that, why should anyone expect that they would feel constrained to abide by the rules of football or to look upon the officials, coach, general manager and owner as authority figures?

Contrary to the pseudo-intellectual coach of the Ravens, Brian Billick, who is in denial when he says that what happened Sunday was not a discipline issue, the Ravens are a team out of control.

Since the coach won't take substantive action, it's up to the owner and senior management to provide real leadership and regain control of the team, even if it means releasing a team "leader" or two and hiring a coach who is unafraid to make difficult decisions.

Until then, the Ravens will continue to be led by the thugs.

Bill Landymore

Bowie

Ravens are lacking in character and class

The Ravens' meltdown should not surprise anyone who has watched their mostly mediocre performance over most of the past five seasons.

The team and the coach have been immature, spending more time during games running their mouths and showboating than playing football.

There is constant crying about the officiating, when the fact is that they are not a fundamentally sound football team.

Character and class are two traits the Ravens don't have.

Keith DiNardo

Elkridge

Blame should start with Billick, R. Lewis

The Ravens' breakdown in discipline Sunday was an embarrassment to all of Baltimore.

The blame begins at the top with Brian Billick and Ray Lewis. If the coach and team leader can't control the team, then what's the point?

Any high school coach worth his salt would have pulled some of the offending players out of the game. Too bad Billick couldn't even find the time to calm them down.

The Ravens should be men and take responsibility for their actions. It wasn't the officials' fault!

Calvin Bond

Orem, Utah

Ravens' immaturity has reached new low

It is one thing for a football team to lose; it is another for grown, professional athletes to lose their composure and stoop to the poor attitude that the Ravens portrayed Sunday.

The level of immaturity displayed by the players disgusted me. You can't score points when you're so engrossed in beating the record for most penalties in a single game!

Sydnee Chavis

Reisterstown

8 Losing seasons show truth about Angelos

Peter Angelos is once again promising a turnaround for the Orioles after another losing season. He must think that we're blithering idiots!

Is Angelos that naive to think that fans will be persuaded by his meaningless blather? Neither Casey Stengel in his prime nor John Schuerholz could make this team a winner.

We no longer are buoyed by statements from the warehouse that the team expects to be competitive by signing top free agents or with the infusion of young minor leaguers who are ready to make their mark.

Fool us once, Mr. Angelos, shame on you! Fool us eight times, shame on us!

We have finally learned our lesson. No amount of snake oil salesmanship will entice us to believe that the Orioles have a legitimate opportunity to contend in the American League East while Angelos is at the helm.

Morton D. Marcus

Baltimore

Late baseball starts aren't kid-friendly

True to form of years past, Fox's prime-time telecasts of baseball playoff games didn't start until after 8:15 p.m., immediately guaranteeing that younger viewers have no opportunity to see the final innings and still get up for school in the morning.

Perish the thought that Fox would move the game to a child-friendly hour outside of prime time. After all, valuable revenue dollars could be lost if Major League Baseball or Fox did anything to accommodate younger fans.

Next, as has become a time-honored tradition with Fox, its baseball broadcasts feature an endless spool of commercials promoting its seediest shows.

I am tired of this annual disregard for my baseball-loving young sons, both in commercial content and in the timing of the broadcasts.

Tom Flynn

Catonsville

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