Boulware comes back with a sack

Ravens notebook

Linebacker gets to the QB on his first play, but says, `I still feel a little rusty'

Pro Football

September 02, 2005|By Brent Jones | Brent Jones,SUN STAFF

After 20 exasperating months, Ravens linebacker Peter Boulware took the field in last night's preseason finale against the Washington Redskins, writing himself a storybook beginning only he must have envisioned.

On his first play, Boulware sacked the Redskins' Patrick Ramsey for a 1-yard loss on third-and-10, displaying more tenacity than pass-rushing prowess but getting a familiar result.

Boulware originally was stymied by left tackle Chris Samuels, who did everything right on the play except stay with Boulware when Ramsey slid out of the pocket. Boulware, sensing where Ramsey was trying to go, shed Samuels and made the tackle, forcing the Redskins to punt from their 32.

"It felt good," Boulware said. "I've been out for about a year and a half. To get out there on my first play and get the quarterback, I was awfully excited. I am proud to be here. I feel pretty good, but I still feel a little rusty. I have a long way to go, but hopefully I'll be ready for the Colts [in the season opener Sept. 11]."

Boulware was asked to cover running back Rock Cartwright out of the backfield on his next play, a Ramsey incompletion. Boulware played about seven more snaps in obvious passing situations, but did not have any more pressures.

"It was great to see him out there," defensive coordinator Rex Ryan said. "How about a sack on the first play ... typical Peter, didn't quit.

"It's a comfort to see No. 58 after the passer."

Boulware has 67 1/2 career sacks, a Ravens record. He will likely play as a situational pass rusher this season.

Terry injures ankle

Right tackle Adam Terry, the Ravens' second-round pick, injured his left ankle on the team's first possession of the second half .

Terry had to be helped off the field after a carry by running back Alex Haynes, and he was eventually carted to the sideline. X-rays were negative.

Terry, who did not return to the game, is the top backup to left tackle Jonathan Ogden.

"I'm going to let the doctors do their thing and try and get back as soon as I can," Terry said. "Who knows? It could be two days and I'm back in action."

Moore can't hold on

Clarence Moore entered the preseason with his job secure, but the second-year receiver may soon start feeling pressure from rookie Mark Clayton.

Moore had his second rough outing of the preseason, dropping two passes last night, both of which would have converted third-down plays.

The first pass was dropped after Moore, who tried to pull the ball in with one hand, was hit by Rufus Brown, stopping a drive that had moved to the Redskins' 30.

Moore then dropped a 20-yard pass from Kyle Boller near the sideline that would have converted a third-and-10.

Moore dropped a touchdown pass when the Ravens played the Atlanta Falcons in the preseason opener.

Good news, bad news

Ravens cornerback Zach Norton had two interceptions last night, but he still isn't sure if that will be enough for him to make the team.

Unfortunately for Norton, those plays were offset by giving up touchdown passes of 22 and 37 yards to Jimmy Farris. Norton is battling Calvin Carlyle, Jamaine Winborne and Mark Estelle for the final defensive back spot.

"I wouldn't rate [the night] too good," Norton said. "I'm a corner, and we live not to give up touchdowns."

End zone

Ogden, linebacker Ray Lewis and cornerbacks Chris McAlister, Deion Sanders and Samari Rolle did not play. ... Fullback Justin Green got his first playing time as the primary running back in the Ravens' one-back set. He gained 11 yards on three carries. ... The Ravens made $11 million worth of improvements to M&T Bank Stadium, including installing 82 plasma televisions on the concourse level. The Ravens also have put in directional signs, new end zone seats and a new credit card payment system.

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