Community college to name new chancellor today

President of Mass. school will take charge at CCBC

July 28, 2005|By Jason Song | Jason Song,SUN STAFF

The president of a Massachusetts community college will be named chancellor of the Community College of Baltimore County today.

Sandra Kurtinitis, head of the 13,000-student Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester, Mass., will succeed Irving Pressley McPhail, who stepped down from his position in late June. Kurtinitis signed a three-year contract worth $190,000 annually.

"I am both honored and humbled by the opportunity to bring leadership to the largest community college in Maryland," she said in a statement yesterday.

The three-campus Community College of Baltimore County has a student body of nearly 73,000.

Kurtinitis, 61, has been president of Quinsigamond for nearly a decade. During her tenure, the school doubled its overall enrollment and completed a $5 million fundraising campaign.

Previously, she was dean of academic affairs at Berkshire Community College in western Massachusetts and spent 22 years as a professor at Prince George's Community College. She has also written and co-written several textbooks.

Thomas M. Lingan, the chairman of the college's board of trustees, said the search committee interviewed dozens of candidates. "What sold me was she referred to herself as a servant leader," Lingan said. "That was very important to us."

Lingan also said that Kurtinitis' experience in Prince George's county was attractive. "She's not coming in totally cold to the political and educational realities in Maryland," he said.

Kurtinitis could not be reached to comment yesterday.

She recently met with some Baltimore County Council members. Chairman Joseph Bartenfelder said he was impressed and believed that Kurtinitis would preserve the school's three-campus system.

"She seems committed to ensuring we maintain the identity of those campuses, and that's important for those communities," Bartenfelder said.

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