Metro

News from around the Baltimore region

July 25, 2005|By Anica Butler and Richard Irwin

BALTIMORE

2 unrelated shootings leave two men dead, teen injured

A 26-year-old man was fatally shot and a teenage girl was wounded early yesterday on a street in Northeast Baltimore, and another man was shot to death last night in the city's latest homicides, police reported.

The first slaying occurred about 3 a.m. Police said Anthony D. Jackson of the 4000 block of Eierman Ave. was walking a block from his home when he was stopped by a gunman who demanded money, said homicide Detective Al Marcus.

According to a witness, Jackson told the gunman he had no money and was then shot once in the head, Marcus said.

A fragment of the bullet that struck Jackson also hit a 16-year-old girl in the left arm as she walked several feet behind him on her way home from a girlfriend's house.

The other slaying occurred about 8:10 last night in the 2400 block of Cylburn Ave., where an unidentified young male was shot several times in the upper body by an unknown assailant, police said.

The victim was taken to Sinai Hospital, two blocks away, and died at 9:45 p.m., police said.

Police yesterday also identified two men who were fatally shot in unrelated homicides, one Friday and the other Saturday.

Aaron Benefield, 19, of the 800 block of N. Caroline St. and another man were sitting on the front porch of a house in the 3100 block of Lawnview Ave. about 3:30 a.m. Friday when each was shot in the upper body by an occupant of a passing car.

Benefield died at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The other man, whose name was not divulged, remained in critical condition at the hospital, police said.

And about 2 a.m. Saturday, Damont Adams, 23, of the 1900 block of Barclay St. was gunned down in the 1600 block of Hazel St. in Curtis Bay and was pronounced dead at the scene.

Anyone with information about the slayings was urged to call homicide detectives at 410-396-2100.

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