The Week That Was

THE WEEK THAT WAS

Metro

News From Around The Baltimore Region

June 19, 2005

Ehrlich's reversal on wage office

The Ehrlich administration reversed course on its plan to close the state's Prevailing Wage Office after a General Assembly attorney found a 1997 law requiring the office to employ at least five inspectors.

Steele moves closer to Senate run

Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele announced that he will begin raising money in anticipation of running for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by retiring Democrat Paul S. Sarbanes.

Baltimore County to repair sewers

Baltimore County tentatively agreed to make more than $800 million in repairs and improvements to its aging sewer system and to pay a $750,000 fine for past sewage spills under a proposed settlement with state and federal environmental agencies and the U.S. Department of Justice.

Hundreds protest bus routes

Hundreds of area residents came to a hearing to vent their anger at state officials who are proposing a radical restructuring of Maryland Transit Administration bus lines.

DSS houses children in office

Baltimore's Department of Social Services was using a downtown office building as a shelter for troubled children who refuse to be placed in group homes. The children slept upright in chairs or on thin mattresses on the floor, and although they were supervised by adults, some ran away. The state promised to fix the problem.

NAACP poised to pick new leader

The NAACP was poised to pick Bruce S. Gordon, the former president of Verizon's Retail Markets Group, as its next president. The 64-member board is expected to approve the 59-year-old executive at its meeting Saturday in Atlanta. The selection would mark a change for the civil rights group, which has traditionally chosen charismatic public figures that include social activists, ministers and political leaders.

City Council approves budget

Baltimore's City Council approved a $2.32 billion budget for next year that boosts public safety spending and reduces the property tax rate by 2 cents per $100 of assessed value. The budget increase is 6.5 percent over this year.

Man sentenced in ordering killing

A Baltimore man was sentenced to six years in prison for ordering the killing of an 11-year-old girl who had testified against him at his murder trial. The hearing ended a case that had come to epitomize the city's struggle with witness intimidation.

Comcast dispute goes to FCC

The Baltimore Oriole's broadcast arm filed a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission alleging that Comcast Corp. is unfairly using its near-monopoly cable franchises to keep the Washington Nationals games from being broadcast on a regional cable network.

Kaufman released from hospital

A. Robert Kaufman, a socialist and perennial candidate who is running for U.S. Senate, was released from Maryland Shock Trauma Center three days after having been beaten with a crowbar and stabbed. A tenant at his West Baltimore apartment building has been charged.

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