Fun for kids, easy for parents

HOME FRONT

June 12, 2005|By Lori Sears | Lori Sears,Sun Staff

Kids are fickle, their tastes ever-changing. One week, they're smitten with ponies, the next they're all about trains. So as a parent, you're challenged to keep up -- and, of course, to placate their whims.

You'll, at least, have an easier time of decorating the kids' walls with Eisenhart Wallcoverings' new Just Imagine! line of children's wallpaper, appropriate for infants through 'tweens. The new collection is printed on Paperez (pronounced paper-ease), an easy-on, easy-off wall covering that goes on dry, and can be quickly removed. The line features 39 sidewall and 40 border patterns, including ponies, dogs and cats, trucks and fire engines, hearts and flowers, moons and stars, sports motifs and more, in numerous colors. Also available are custom name borders. (At right is the "Play the Game" pattern; below, "Hugs and Kisses.")

Paperez is durable, washable, environmentally friendly and won't shrink or stretch. Made of a nonwoven material that uses polyester fibers, it prevents moisture from being trapped between the paper and wall, inhibiting mold or mildew growth.

The Just Imagine! line comes in 27-inch-wide double rolls and sells for $34.99 to $39.99 per border spool or sidewall single roll. Call 800-931-9255 or visit www.eisenhart wallcoverings.com to find a retailer.

Handle them delicately Sure, we've all got collectibles we want to preserve. Whether it's a work of fine art, some silver, old photos, a military medal, a precious letter or even a baby tooth, it's a treasure, and we want to make sure it lasts. So whether you're a serious collector or just a sentimental fool, the new book Saving Stuff (Fireside, $16) by Don Williams and Louisa Jaggar will teach you how to keep your prized possessions in perfect condition, cheaply and easily. Here are just a few tips:

Do not glue photos into an album. Rather, use corner mounts on plain rag paper or archival buffered paper.

Keep it chilly. Lowering your home's temperature by up to 18 degrees can double the life span of collectibles.

To preserve baby shoes, stuff them with acid-free paper or polyester batting. Store in a zippered plastic bag.

Store your prized sports cards individually in polyester envelopes, then place vertically in an archival box.

When turning the pages of a vintage book, don't use white cotton gloves, as the fabric may snag. Rather, use a piece of folded acid-free paper to flip pages.

Can't beat this price

It was just an idea. But garden writer and photographer Cheryl Richter's good idea has since blossomed into a successful project. Her idea was to find unsold trees and plants, hire disabled workers to package them and then send the trees and plants, free of cost, to anyone who wanted them. Any visitor to www.freetreesand plants.com can browse the available evergreen, flowering and shade trees, shrubs, perennials and bulbs -- new selections are constantly added -- and reserve anything they'd like, for free. The only fee is $6.95 for shipping.

The healthy plants and trees, which come from growers that supply famous garden catalogs, would have been destroyed. But Richter is able to obtain them at little or no cost, then work with organizations offering employment to the disabled for packaging.

Trees and plants are shipped dormant, bare-root and by standard mail. Visit the Web site or call 402-475-5631.

Events

Learn about container gardening at the program "Creating a Container," noon-1:30 p.m. Friday at the U.S. Botanic Garden Conservatory, 100 Maryland Ave. S.W., Washington. Free. Call 202-225-8333.

See new paintings by Patrick Moser at the exhibit Screenings, running through June 30 at Wynn Bone Gallery, 161 Main St., Annapolis. Pictured is "Paused Rembrandt," an oil on canvas. Call 410-280-8840.

Home Front welcomes interesting home and garden news. Please send suggestions to Lori Sears, Home Front, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or fax to 410-783-2519. Information must be received at least four weeks in advance to be considered.

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