Perlozzo is interested in managing Royals

ORIOLES NOTEBOOK

Longtime O's coach sees young talent in K.C.

Sosa awaits foot check

Notebook

May 18, 2005|By Jeff Zrebiec | Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Sam Perlozzo has not been contacted about the Kansas City Royals' managerial opening, but the longtime Orioles coach has a definite interest in the job.

"I thought about it, but I think about all the openings," said Perlozzo, the Orioles bench coach, before last night's series opener with the Royals. "I don't think there's any question that I'd love to be considered."

Perlozzo has been on the Orioles' coaching staff for 10 seasons and the bench coach for the past five. He interviewed for the Orioles' managerial opening before last season, but the job went to Lee Mazzilli. He also interviewed for the Seattle opening before the 2003 season, but the Mariners hired Bob Melvin.

"I think they have some good young arms and some good young players," Perlozzo said of the Royals. "Anyplace you are going to have a chance to manage is a good place. They've had great winning traditions here. It's a great place. I don't know if they are looking for someone with managing experience or not. That's what the papers say, anyway."

Bob Schaefer has been serving as the Royals' interim manager since Tony Pena resigned May 10. Schaefer has Orioles ties as he served as a special assistant to former general manager Syd Thrift from 1998 to 2001.

The Kansas City Star reported yesterday that Royals general manager Allard Baird expects to start calling candidates by the end of the week to gauge interest in the opening.

The story said that the Royals plan to pursue candidates who have managed in the big leagues. Some of the names in the story included Art Howe, Gene Lamont, Jimy Williams, Jim Fregosi, Grady Little and Larry Bowa. Schaefer and Double-A Wichita manager Frank White are reportedly candidates, too.

Another name that has been mentioned is Orioles TV commentator Buck Martinez, who played for the Royals from 1969 to 1977. He has managerial experience with the Toronto Blue Jays, in 2001 and 2002.

"If they wanted me, I'd certainly like to talk to them," Martinez said. "Obviously, I'm not going to refuse to talk to anybody. I respect ... the organization, I respect ... Allard and if they would like to speak to me, I'd be honored."

Sosa awaits checkup

Mazzilli didn't completely rule out right fielder Sammy Sosa appearing in some capacity in this weekend's series against the Philadelphia Phillies.

Sosa, out since May 6 with an abscess and staph infection on the bottom of his left foot, is scheduled to see team orthopedist Dr. Charles Silberstein today and then hit off a tee in Camden Yards. If the foot continues to heal, he would be allowed to start working out with his likely return being sometime next week.

"Depending on how he is, he might be available for the weekend or the next series," Mazzilli said. "A lot of it is going to depend on what happens tomorrow."

In other injury news, Mazzilli kept Larry Bigbie (left hamstring) out of the lineup for the fourth straight game.

"I probably could have played [Bigbie] today," Mazzilli said. "It was just a gut feeling to get him another day."

Wilson out, Moriarty in

The Orioles acquired infielder Mike Moriarty, who was on their Opening Day roster in 2002, from the Chicago Cubs yesterday for future considerations and assigned him to Triple-A Ottawa.

Moriarty, who was batting .217 in 18 games for the Cubs' Triple-A team in Iowa, replaces infielder Enrique Wilson, who was at Ottawa but requested and was granted his release. Wilson, also a former New York Yankee, was signed by the Cubs yesterday.

Wilson, who was one of the Orioles' last roster cuts, had a clause in his contract saying that if he wasn't called up by May 15, he had the option of asking for his release.

Wilson hit .279 with three homers and eight RBIs in 20 games for Ottawa.

Sun staff writer Dan Connolly contributed to this article.

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