Loyola surprises No. 11 UMass, 6-5, for 3rd win in row

Delaware beats Towson for first time since '00, 11-5

Men

March 27, 2005|By FROM STAFF REPORTS

Loyola put together a team effort to upset No. 11 Massachusetts, 6-5, yesterday at Diane Geppi-Aikens Field.

Freshman Shane Koppens scored three goals and junior goalie Michael Fretwell stopped 16 shots as the Greyhounds won their third consecutive game to move to 3-3 overall and 2-1 in the Eastern College Athletic Conference.

After the Greyhounds watched a three-goal lead disappear, Koppens scored the game-winner with less than four minutes remaining.

The Minutemen fell to 5-2 and 0-1.

Delaware 11, No. 14 Towson 5: The Blue Hens jumped out to a 6-0 lead and senior goalkeeper Chris Collins matched his career high with 19 saves as they upset the visiting Tigers.

Delaware (6-3, 1-0 Colonial Athletic Association) defeated Towson for the first time since 2000 and for the third time in the past 16 meetings.

Two-time defending CAA champion Towson (4-3, 0-1) lost its second straight game and had a 13-game win streak against CAA opponents broken with its first league loss since the 2002 season.

UMBC 11, Vermont 5: Junior attackman Brendan Mundorf, who entered play as the nation's leading scorer, had three goals and two assists as the host Retrievers (2-3) beat the Catamounts (2-3) in the America East opener for both schools.

No. 3 Duke 12, No. 5 Georgetown 3: The visiting Blue Devils scored the game's first five goals en route to a 7-1 halftime lead over the Hoyas (4-2).

Dan Flannery led the Blue Devils (9-0) with five goals and Matt Danowski had four assists.

No. 7 Notre Dame 9, No. 15 Hofstra 8: Pat Walsh scored his sixth goal of the game in the second overtime to push the Irish (4-1) past the Pride (3-4).

The Irish led nearly the entire game, going up by as many as four goals, but the host Pride scored twice in the final two minutes to force extra periods.

No. 8 Syracuse 10, No. 12 Princeton 8: Mike Leveille scored three goals to lead the visiting Orange (2-3) to its fifth win over the Tigers (0-4) in the past six meetings.

No. 9 Army 11, Colgate 4: Jim Wagner led the visiting Black Knights (5-1, 3-0 Patriot League) with four goals.

The Raiders fell to 3-3 and 0-2.

No. 10 Cornell 15, Yale 6: After trailing 2-1 midway through the first quarter, the Big Red (3-2, 1-0 Ivy League) controlled the remainder of the game, scoring four straight goals to take the lead.

Kevin Nee scored four goals for the Big Red. The Bulldogs (3-2, 1-1) had 29 turnovers.

No. 19 Bucknell 14, Lafayette 2: Kirk Klett scored a career-high five goals as the Bison (5-2, 3-0 Patriot League) routed the Leopards (0-7, 0-3), who got both goals from Jon Paulson.

No. 20 Brown 10, Ohio State 8: The host Bears turned around a 3-1 first-quarter deficit by outscoring the Buckeyes 8-1 in the following two periods.

The Bears (3-1) received three goals from Chazz Woodson, and Justin Doran paced the Buckeyes (2-4) with a goal and two assists.

Haverford 14, McDaniel 9: The Fords (6-2, 1-0) picked up their first win over the host Green Terror (3-3, 0-2) in 28 years.

Dean Granoff led the offense with five goals and Max Tcheyan added four.

Brad Baer had three goals and two assists for the Green Terror.

Mount St. Mary's 11, Wagner 7: Junior Matt Warner scored five goals as the host Mountaineers (3-2, 2-0 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference) outplayed the Seahawks (0-6, 0-2).

Washington College 14, Dickinson 3: Sophomore attackman Andrew Ostrusky scored four goals to pace the Shoremen (4-2, 2-0 Centennial Conference) over the visiting Red Devils (2-3, 0-1).

Goucher 9, Mary Washington 7: Dan Flamholz had three goals and a pair of assists for the host Gophers (6-3, 3-1 Capital Athletic Conference).

Mary Washington fell to 5-3, 2-1.

Villa Julie 21, Centenary 3: Junior Andrew White led all scorers with six goals and three assists as the host Mustangs jumped out to an 8-0 lead over the Cyclones (0-3).

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.