Deaths Elsewhere

Deaths Elsewhere

October 21, 2004

Sam Lender, 84, who with his brothers turned a tiny Connecticut bakery into the company Lender's Bagels, died of heart failure Sunday in Boca Raton, Fla.

The Lender family moved from Poland to New Haven, Conn., in 1929. At the age of 12, Mr. Lender began working at his father's bagel business, rolling dough into bagels with his brothers.

By the mid-1930s, eight workers were producing 300 dozen bagels a day. The brothers decided to freeze their bagels, and they went national in 1967.

Betty Hill, 85, whose tale of being abducted by aliens launched her to fame and became the subject of a best-selling book and television movie, died of lung cancer Sunday at her home in Portsmouth, N.H.

Mrs. Hill claimed that she and her husband, Barney, were abducted by extraterrestrials in New Hampshire's White Mountains on a trip home from Canada in 1961. The Hills said they were puzzled when they arrived home and noticed Betty's torn and stained dress, Barney's scuffed shoes, shiny spots on their car, stopped watches and no memory of two hours.

Under hypnosis three years later, they recounted being kidnapped and examined by aliens. The couple gained international notoriety after going public with their story, traveling across the country to give speeches and making numerous television and radio appearances.

Their story also became the focus of John G. Fuller's 1966 best-selling book, Interrupted Journey, and a television movie starring James Earl Jones and Estelle Parsons.

Hill retired from UFO lecturing in her 70s and complained that the quest for knowledge about extraterrestrials had become tainted with commercialism. Too many people with "flaky ideas, fantasies and imaginations" were making UFO and abduction reports, she told the Associated Press in a 1991 interview.

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