Deaths Elsewhere

Deaths Elsewhere

September 23, 2004

William C. Reeves, 87, a leading authority on the spread and control of mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile virus, died Sunday at a hospital in Walnut Creek, Calif., from complications after a fall.

Dr. Reeves and a fellow scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, William M. Hammon, helped lead the research team that in 1941 isolated both western equine and St. Louis encephalitis viruses from a species of mosquito called Culex tarsalis. That discovery helped public health officials target a virus that afflicted the western United States throughout the 1930s. During World War II, Dr. Reeves advised the U.S. military about mosquito-borne viruses in the Pacific. After the war, he became a professor at UC Berkeley. He was dean of the School of Public Health from 1967 to 1971 and headed the school's epidemiology program from 1971 to 1985.

Dr. Reeves came out of retirement five years ago when West Nile virus emerged in New York.

Richard A. Pierce, 86, one of the foremost authorities on Russian Alaska, died Sept. 14 at his home in Kingston, Ontario. He published, wrote or edited more than 60 volumes on Alaska history, according to the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where he had been a professor.

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