Business Digest

BUSINESS DIGEST

September 20, 2004

Five companies receive economic development awards

The Howard County Economic Development Authority presented Economic Development Achievement Awards during its annual meeting at the Ten Oaks Ballroom in Clarksville.

As part of the authority's annual awards program, five companies are recognized for their contributions to the economy and quality of life in Howard County. Successful candidates have shown a strong commitment to corporate leadership and community development.

Winners include Next Day Blinds of Jessup, which received the award for growth by an existing Howard County company. The company is expanding its Jessup location with an additional 40,000 square feet to capitalize on sales-growth potential in the Baltimore market.

Neschen AG, a German-owned company, was recognized as a premier international company with North American headquarters in Howard County. The Elkridge company, specializing in image protection films and document conservation, marked the addition of a 40,000-square-foot manufacturing operation in November.

Syntonics LLC received an award for success as an emerging technology company. Syntonics, a graduate of the county's NeoTech Incubator, is the first tech transfer company from Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, specializing in defense electronics.

Rhee Bros. Inc., headquartered in Columbia, received the award for a successful minority-owned company. Its products are distributed to more than 1,500 retailers, including Asian grocery stores and grocery chains such as Giant, Shoppers Food Warehouse, Costco and Tops Market in New York.

Humanim, a nonprofit community-based organization focused on serving individuals with disabilities, offers mental health, vocational, neuro-rehabilitation, developmental disabilities and deaf services. Humanim was recognized for providing services in 2003-2004 to more than 4,000 individuals with disabilities, most of them living at or below the poverty level.

Each awardee received an engraved crystal ball.

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