Sun News Digest

SUN NEWS DIGEST

September 12, 2004

NATIONAL

Grief and remembrance for 9/11

On the third anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, Americans paused yesterday to remember and mourn. Relatives of those who were killed read out their names at Ground Zero in New York. President Bush and his Democratic opponent, Sen. John Kerry, also paid quiet tribute to the victims. [Page 3a]

Clinton spurs surge in checkups

Former President Bill Clinton's highly publicized bypass surgery has caused worried, middle-aged men across the country with similar symptoms to rush to hospitals for checkups. Doctors and nurses are calling the surge "Clinton syndrome." [Page 12a]

WORLD

Ivan wobbles, sparing Jamaica

Hurricane Ivan dealt Jamaica only a glancing blow yesterday but strengthened to a Category 5 storm as it headed toward the Cayman Islands. Ivan has killed 56 people across the Caribbean, and is projected to move between the Cayman Islands, hit Cuba and either move into the Gulf of Mexico or hit South Florida. [Page 1a]

Soldier sentenced for abuse

A U.S. soldier tearfully admitted abusing inmates at Abu Ghraib prison in a military court in Baghdad yesterday. Spc. Armin Cruz, 24, the first Military Intelligence soldier convicted in the scandal, received a lighter sentence in return for his testimony against others charged. [Page 17a]

MARYLAND

30-year fugitive faces charges

On Christmas Eve three decades ago Michael Hughes, sought as a suspect in the shooting death of a police employee, told his younger brother that he was leaving West Baltimore forever. He went to Boston, where he became a counselor at a city-run homeless shelter. A fight Sept. 5 unraveled his new life in Boston, leaving Hughes to face a murder charge in Baltimore. [Page 1a]

State Senator Kittleman dies

Republican state Sen. Robert H. Kittleman, a cattle farmer, Westinghouse engineer and one-time minority leader in the Maryland House of Delegates, died yesterday. He was 78. Mr. Kittleman, who served as a delegate for 19 years and joined the state Senate in 2002, died of leukemia, surrounded by family.[Page 1b]

Phelps returns to hero's welcome

Thousands of people from across Maryland and the mid-Atlantic states greeted Olympic champion swimmer Michael Phelps in Towson yesterday. There, public officials renamed a street in his honor, led a parade down York Road and bestowed upon him more proclamations, flags, plaques and trinkets than he could carry. [Page 1b]

SPORTS

Hernandez carries N.Y. past O's

The Yankees knocked Sidney Ponson from the game during a three-run eighth inning, sending the Orioles to a 5-2 defeat at Camden Yards. The Yankees got yet another sterling pitching performance from Orlando Hernandez, who allowed just five hits over seven innings to win his eighth straight decision. [Page 1e]

Maryland rolls over Temple

A week after struggling against Northern Illinois, the No. 23 Maryland football team strode to a 45-22 victory over Temple in College Park. For the Terps (2-0), Joel Statham completed 18 of 25 passes for 268 yards and two touchdowns, and Sammy Maldonado ran for a career-high 106 yards and two touchdowns. [Page 1e]

Kuznetsova takes Open title

Svetlana Kuznetsova beat Elena Dementieva, 6-3, 7-5, for the U.S. Open women's title, capping a year of Russian domination in tennis' Grand Slams. As of four months ago, no Russian woman ever won a major, but Anastasia Myskina beat Dementieva in the French Open final, and Maria Sharapova won Wimbledon. In men's action, Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt advanced to today's final. [Page 3e]

BUSINESS

Homeless link up online

The Internet Age has been a welcome advance for the homeless, as computers become more available in community centers and public libraries. Homeless people nationwide have created online journals chronicling their experiences, set up message boards to help others find shelter and food, and designed sites that offer a clearinghouse of survival information. [Page 1d]

Portfolio tips from the tundra

Daniel F. Dent, who twice participated in the storied Iditarod dog-sled race in Alaska, is also a Baltimore money manager with one of the best-performing funds in the country. A sled pulled along by 16 dogs isn't unlike a portfolio of companies, with disparate parts that need to act in concert and that demand attention to detail. [Page 1d]

TODAY

For multi-taskers, multi-bumbling

For many Americans, multi-tasking has become a way of life. But researchers peering into the brains of those engaged in several tasks at once are concluding what some suspect: that multi-tasking, which many embraced as the key to success, is instead a formula for shoddy work, mismanaged time, rote solutions, stress and forgetfulness. Not to mention car crashes and kitchen fires. [Page 1n]

The drama of Shock Trauma

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