Home Front

HOME FRONT

August 08, 2004|By Lori Sears | Lori Sears,Sun Staff

Lighting the way to nature's scents

Bring the delightful aromas of the outdoors indoors with the new candle collection Luminaria from the Thymes. Luminaria, the latest and most extensive line from the body, bath and home-care company, features 15 scented candles, each with fragrances inspired by nature. The perfume-quality scents fall into five fragrance families -- fruit, floral, Oriental, woods and fresh -- and include Amber Spice, Ancient Wood, Blackberry Leaf and Persian Pear.

Each 6.5-ounce candle is made of paraffin wax with essential oils, and burns for about 50 hours. Candles retail for $23 each and are available at specialty retailers and online at www.thymes.com. Call 800-366-4071.

Kitty goes ticktock

He's devilish, but mighty cute. And he's perhaps the most recognized cat in the world. No, not Felix or Morris. Not Garfield or Heathcliff. Not even Sylvester. He's been adored for years and adorning homes for generations. He's the animated Kit-Cat Klock, born during the Great Depression. The classic black-and-white feline timepiece with trademark wagging tail, rolling eyes and mischievous grin, has been available for purchase from the California Clock Co. for more than 70 years. And now through the end of this year, the company is selling the adorable clock in new, bright, limited-edition colors -- flamingo pink and turquoise.

The colorful, new Kit-Cat Klocks (as well as the traditional black-and-white versions) are available in Gentleman and Lady versions, with the gent in a white bow-tie, and the long-eyelashed gal in a white pearl necklace. Both versions are available jeweled (with 128 Austrian crystals) for $69.99 or non-jeweled for $49.99.

Kit-Cat Klocks can be purchased at Bed Bath & Beyond, specialty shops and online at www.Kit-Cat.com. Call 800-4Kit-Cat.

Open-and-shut advice

Screen doors get a workout. They're tugged, yanked, flung open, forced shut, kicked around and generally treated pretty roughly. And come summertime, they work overtime with the kids running in and out of the house. So it's no wonder your screen door has started squeaking, slams shut and doesn't close properly. Lou Manfredini, national home-improvement expert from Ace Hardware, offers several troubleshooting tips:

Check the hinges. Add a drop of 3-in-1 oil or WD-40 to stop the squeaking. If you see rust, remove the pin, clean, then lubricate before reinserting the pin.

Check the weather-stripping. If it's torn or worn out, replace.

Check the shaft on the spring closure. If the door closes too slowly or quickly, adjust the tension. And add a few drops of oil. If all fails, replace the closer.

n Check and care for your screen. If torn or stretched, pick up a screen repair kit.

For more suggestions or tips, visit www.acehardware.com.

Events

The exhibit Nature*Woman*Spirit, running through Friday at Slayton House Gallery, Wilde Lake Village Green, Columbia, features photography by Jerry Weinstein, pastels by Cher Compton (pictured) and acrylics by Roxana Sinex. Call 410-730-3987 for hours.

Learn how to attract butterflies to your garden at the program "Butterfly Gardening" at 5 p.m. Saturday at the U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. N.E., Washington. $10. Call 202-245-5898 or visit www.usna.usda.gov to register.

Home Front welcomes interesting home and garden news. Please send suggestions to Lori Sears, Home Front, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or fax to 410-783-2519. Information must be received at least four weeks in advance to be considered.

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