Henri Paul Squitieri, 51, developer, rec coach

July 25, 2004

Henri Paul "Rick" Squitieri, a developer and recreation activist, died of complications after open-heart surgery Thursday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 51 and lived in the Idlewylde section of Baltimore County.

Mr. Squitieri, who was born and raised in Pittsburgh, suffered from birth from Uhl's anomaly, an extremely rare congenital heart defect that affects the right ventricular wall. Despite his heart condition, Mr. Squitieri was determined to live a full and active life.

He earned a bachelor's degree in 1975 in political science and history from the University of Pittsburgh. After working for several years in banking, he moved to Baltimore in 1980, when he took a position with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

He was vice president of real estate for Commercial Credit Corp. during the early 1980s, then joined the Savings Bank of Baltimore in 1986, where he was vice president of real estate lending until 1991.

After leaving the bank, Mr. Squitieri worked in development and was a partner of the Willow Pond development in Carroll County. He was still working in development at the time of his death.

Mr. Squitieri was active in the Towson Recreation Council, where he coached football and lacrosse. He was also an active member of the Idlewylde Community Association.

"He really enjoyed sailing the Chesapeake Bay aboard his 28-foot Aloha sailboat," said his wife of 25 years, the former Margaret A. Shannon.

He was also an avid reader and collector of Civil War books.

A Memorial Mass will be offered at 2 p.m. tomorrow at St. Pius X Roman Catholic Church, at York and Overbrook roads, Rodgers Forge.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Squitieri is survived by a son, Paul J. Squitieri, 13; a daughter, Ann E. Squitieri, 17; his mother, Elsie J. Squitieri of Pittsburgh; and a brother, Noel J. Squitieri of Kunkletown, Pa.

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