Sun News Digest

SUN NEWS DIGEST

May 21, 2004

NATIONAL

Many in GOP anxious

As members of Congress head home today for the 10-day Memorial Day recess, many Republicans leave anxious about the war in Iraq, disheartened by President Bush's sagging approval ratings and worried about dissent within the party. [Page 3a]

Zinc defeats pneumonia in study

Zinc supplements, a popular if controversial weapon against colds in the United States, are effective in treating cases of severe pneumonia, researchers have reported. [Page 4a]

WORLD

Chalabi home in Iraq raided

U.S. and Iraqi law enforcement officers raided the home of one-time U.S. ally Ahmad Chalabi in Iraq, seizing documents and computers. Chalabi said American authorities were angry about his recent criticism of the coalition authority. [Page 1a]

Palestinian convicted in attack

As deadly fighting continued in the Gaza Strip, Israel convicted Palestinian uprising leader Marwan Barghouti of ordering an attack that killed five and supplying money and weapons for other attacks. [Page 12a]

MARYLAND

Guilty plea entered in '84 murder

Kimberly Shay Ruffner, a former East Baltimore man with a history of sexual attacks, pleaded guilty to the 1984 murder of a 9-year-old girl in Rosedale -- a crime for which Kirk Bloodsworth spent nine years behind bars. Ruffner was sentenced to life in prison. [Page 1a]

Man held 6 years without charges

Attorneys for the Maryland Disability Law Center have petitioned Baltimore County Circuit Court to free a 45-year-old man who was arrested in 1995 and remains locked up in a state mental hospital even though the charges against him were dropped six years ago. [Page 1a]

Cheltenham workers punished

In the last six months, the state has quietly disciplined 30 youth workers at its Cheltenham juvenile detention center in Prince George's County for mistreating or neglecting boys as young as 11 in their care. At least five of the workers were fired for allegedly assaulting youths, officials said. [Page 1a]

BUSINESS

Online groceries making gains

After a disastrous flop in the 1990s, the online grocery market is making a quiet comeback and expanding in various markets, including Baltimore. Millions of consumers are buying milk, eggs and other food via their personal computers. [Page 1c]

Strong, his firm fined $140 million

Richard S. Strong and the investment firm he founded, Strong Capital Management Inc., agreed to pay a combined $140 million to settle fraud charges involving improper trading in the company's mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced. [Page 1c]

SPORTS

Ravens' Wright could miss season

Ravens backup quarterback Anthony Wright will undergo surgery on his throwing shoulder as soon as today and, in the worst-case scenario, could be sidelined for the entire NFL season. This jolt to the depth chart has prompted team officials to begin pursuing free agent Kerry Collins. [Page 1d]

O's routed in Lopez's first start

The Mariners broke up a scoreless game with a six-run fifth inning and beat the Orioles, 11-0, in Rodrigo Lopez's first start of the season. Jamie Moyer improved to 15-2 against his former team, which was trying for its first three-game sweep in Seattle since 1997. [Page 1d]

Angelos firmly against D.C. team

Peter Angelos holds that a major league team in Washington would hurt his Orioles, and commissioner Bud Selig states that his "first job and responsibility" is to protect baseball's 30 existing franchises, but that doesn't eliminate Washington as a possible home for the Montreal Expos. [Page 1d]

TODAY

City's bars among smokiest

Mark Travers, a doctoral student at the University at Buffalo, visited 53 watering holes in seven cities -- East Coast and West -- covertly measuring air quality. Baltimore's bars are the second smokiest, behind Washington's, in the seven-city sample. And the smokiest bar in Baltimore? The Charles Village Pub. [Page 1e]

BSO forms new partnership

Reaching out to the African-American community, the Baltimore Symphony enters a partnership with the Soulful Symphony and founder Darin Atwater, who is named BSO composer-in-residence. [Page 3e]

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.