Orlowska-andrews, Alecija

May 09, 2004

ALECIJAORLOWSKA-ANDREWS, (a longtime resident of Baltimore, Maryland) born November 6, 1920 in Warsaw, Poland, during a time when Poland was again seeking its place in the world as an independent Nation. Alecija's father was of Swedish heritage and her mother belonged to the titled nobility, the Counts Orlowski, a title granted by the Pope, sometimes referred to as the black nobility. Her father was an industrialist who owned a steel mill in Sweden and would frequently travel between Warsaw and Sweden on business. During WWII after the Nazis had conquered the young restored Polish Nation, Alecija who was a teenager was rounded up in the streets of Warsaw with other youths and transported to Germany as forced labor on a sugar beet farm. She had heard that her Uncle, Count Orlowski, who was a pilot in the Polish Air Force had flown his plane out of Poland to join the Polish Government in Exile fighting against the Nazi occupation of her beloved homeland. Count Orlowski was presumed dead in action fighting for his homeland. At the end of WWII, those that were rounded up on the streets of Warsaw and forcibly taken from their homes and families to worked forced labor in Nazi Germany were free. With Warsaw's total destruction and no way to find out if anyone survived, Alecija fled West on foot with other members of her camp for the protection of the Allied Armies. It was at this time that she met Colonel Roberts Andrews, U.S. military, and Aide de Camp to General Patton. Col. Andrews and Alecija were married at Hanover Castle, Germany, where Alecija received her oak leaves for horse riding. Col and Mrs. Robert Andrews moved to the U.S. where Mrs. Andrews pursued successful careers as a professional model, interior decorator and talented hostess. Alecija Orlowska-Andrews was a trustee of the Polish Nobility Association Foundation, (PNAF) for 35 years. It is not believed she was survived by any immediate family members. Mrs. Andrews died of complications caused by a stroke on April 6, 2004 in Baltimore. She requested that her body be donated for medical research. Mrs Andrews requested in her will that donations in her name be sent to the PNAF, Villa Anneslie, 529 Dunkirk Rd., Baltimore, MD. 21212

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