N. County's 1-2 punch decks Chesapeake-AA

Martinez, Mullins help Karasek beat No. 1, 5-4

High Schools

May 08, 2004|By Glenn P. Graham | Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF

The North County softball team threw No. 1 Chesapeake of Anne Arundel a changeup yesterday by sending freshman Heather Karasek to the mound.

But there has been no secret this season as to whom North County's 3-4 hitters are.

Senior Danielle Martinez and junior Beth Mullins combined to go 3-for-4 with three walks, three runs scored and two RBIs to lead the No. 5 Knights to a 5-4 victory over Chesapeake in Ferndale.

Karasek, getting her third start behind the Knights' top pitcher, Mullins, also did her share, getting out of a sixth-inning jam and controlling the Cougars' middle of the lineup in the seventh to get the win.

Coming off a 5-1 loss to Northeast on Thursday, the Knights responded favorably to improve to 13-4 overall and 11-3 in Anne Arundel County. Chesapeake (16-3) remains in first place at 13-2 in the league.

"We just came out and we did the jobs we're supposed to," said Mullins, who stayed in the lineup as the designated hitter. "It was really important for us to rebound today. We really needed it for us -- to get us up -- and rebounding like this against a good team like Chesapeake is really big for us."

Mullins' double to deep left scored two runs in a three-run third inning, and after the Cougars closed the gap to 3-2 in the fifth, the Knights answered with Martinez (2-for-3, two RBIs) and Mullins (1-for-1, three walks, two runs) scoring on hits by Amanda Baldwin and Toni Evans.

Chesapeake got a two-run single from Meghan Hickman in the sixth, but Karasek handled the rest.

"Basically I found out 45 minutes before the game that I would get the start," said Karasek, who used a fastball, changeup and screwball to limit the Cougars to seven hits. "I got to the mound and was just going after it. I knew it was a crucial game and knew I had to get it done."

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