Area chefs serve up help for charitable causes

HOT STUFF

Eats: dining reviews, Hot Stuff

May 06, 2004|By Sloane Brown | Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

Last week was busy for B-more's out-and-abouters. First, they had to stuff their faces at Meals On Wheels' "12th annual Culinary Extravaganza." This year, about 25 local chefs served up various and sundry concoctions to several hundred food lovers.

The evening's big hit? "I think the Elkridge Club's lamb-sicles are pretty good," said insurance guru Al Lietzau IV as he went back for thirds. Meanwhile, SmithBarney VP Jay Brooks said the Bicycle's pear salad came in a close second.

Two nights later, eating out was a "have-to." After all, more than 150 area restaurants were donating a percentage of the day's proceeds to Moveable Feast in its "Dining Out For Life" program. If you weren't chowing down at one of the participating restaurants, you were probably a "Dining Out" host. Carole Sibel could be seen schmoozing at Linwood/Due. Nan Rosenthal and Sandie Nagel seated sup-pers at Cibo. And John Yuhanick was all over Four West.

BMA birthday gala

One of the spring's most anticipated "do's" did Saturday night. The Baltimore Museum of Art celebrated a big birthday with its 90th Anniversary Gala. Party chair Stiles Colwill, BMA board chair Sue Cohen and BMA director Doreen Bolger greeted 500 guests, who mingled under a big tent set up on the museum's front steps. Who wasn't there? Certainly not Dorothy Scott, Meg and John Collins, Leslie and Marc Ugol, Candy and Ben Carson, Marla and David Oros, Suzi and David Cordish, Terry Morganthaler and Patrick Kerins, Mary Dempsey, Nanny and Jack Warren, Jackie and Freeman Hrabowski, John Shields, Rheda Becker, Margot and John Heller, Lenel and John Meyerhoff, Billie Grieb and Duke Lohr, Michael Ross, Tim and Barbara Schweizer, Steve Ziger and Jamie Snead, Lisa and Greg Barnhill, Karen and Paul Winicki. You get the idea. Dinner was as posh as the crowd -- chilled Maine lobster, beef tenderloin and John Russell Pope Cake (several of which served as table centerpieces -- replicas of the BMA's main building, which Pope designed -- before being served for dessert).

Lots of folks there were still talking about the heckuva hullabaloo the weekend before. That would be the shindig that lobbyist Curt Decker threw for his 60th birthday at the City Cafe. Curt's invitation had summed up the gist of the bash -- "To Lie or Not to Lie." Obviously, Curt decided on the latter.

Red Star is back

Remember the old Red Star restaurant in Fells Point? It's now the new Red Star in Fells Point. Same locale, new owners and new building. Developer Larry Silverstein says his company, Union Box Co., has renovated several buildings around South Wolfe Street and really wanted a restaurant there for residents and businesses in the area. So he tore down the old Red Star, leaving only the front wall, and rebuilt it using almost all reclaimed materials from other buildings. That way, the place retains its Fells Point feel.

Larry and manager Louis Chernock are hoping to attract a slightly older professional crowd than the weekend Fells Point revelers who fill many of the joints there. Larry describes the casual menu as "a step above pub food" with salads (like blackened shrimp and chicken Caesar, asparagus and lemon, grilled lobster tail over chopped greens), sandwiches (i.e. chicken and prosciutto on focaccia, burger on a ciabatta with pancetta, Swiss cheese and marinated mushrooms, and three cheeses grilled on focaccia) and thin-crust gourmet pizzas, as well as about five rotating entree specials. Prices generally range from $5 to about $18.

Red Star, 410-675-0212, is at 906 S. Wolfe St. Its hours are 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. seven days a week. There's a 225-car parking lot across the street -- with attendant -- just for Red Star patrons. And it's free.

To submit tips, ideas and possible items for Hot Stuff, send e-mail to sloane@sloanebrown.com or fax to 410-675-3451.

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