Letters

LETTERS

March 28, 2004

Terps, Owens show good and bad of sports

The past month has shown us both ends of the spectrum in sportsmanship and leadership in local sports.

The best was the brilliant Gary Williams and his amazing young Maryland Terrapins. Coach Williams deserves a lot of consideration for national Coach of the Year honors for his masterful job of taking a bunch of very talented but very young kids and molding them into a cohesive group of winners.

The worst was Terrell Owens. His childish, self-centered antics in demanding his trade to the Ravens be overturned so he could negotiate his own trade to another team was just an example of a spoiled-rotten child who didn't like somebody telling him what to do.

He knew he would never surpass Ray Lewis as the Ravens' most popular player, so he went where he could be the center of attention that he craves.

Jerry Pivec Arnold

Palmer needs to learn when to shut his mouth

When, if ever, will Jim Palmer learn to keep quiet?

First, he demeaned former Orioles manager Earl Weaver with some tasteless remarks about Earl's personal problems at a roast a few years back.

Now, he implies that former Oriole Brady Anderson may have been involved with steroids in 1996 ["Palmer says steroids may have aided 50-HR Anderson in '96," March 16].

When questioned about his comments, Palmer was quoted as saying: "I don't know if Brady took steroids. How would I know?"

Well, Jim, if you don't know, why not just zip it up rather than stir up suspicion and controversy?

Joe Trebes Baltimore

Preston misses mark with shots at Terps

Why can't Mike Preston give the Terps men's basketball team any credit for its great season?

Instead, he just tries to diminish the team's accomplishments. ["Growing UM gets glimpse of the heights," March 21].

He didn't give the Terps credit for their amazing ACC tournament run, instead stating that it beat "an overconfident Wake Forest, an injury-riddled North Carolina State and a Duke team that had blown them out in Durham, N.C., only three weeks before."

He also puts down their players, wondering how Maryland got as far as they did with Jamar Smith and Nik Caner-Medley as starters. He later states that Caner-Medley needs to spend the summer finding something he can do well. That is completely uncalled for.

Smith was a huge part of Maryland's season, and though Caner-Medley was mostly ineffective down the stretch, he showed flashes during the season that he will be a very good player in the future.

Mike Preston needs to start seeing the good in things, instead of always looking for the bad.

Dan Krupinsky Shrewsbury, Pa.

NFL must get tough on `Bad Boy' behavior

While Terrell Owens might fit well into the "Bad Boy" image that the Ravens seem to be acquiring, I feel the time is past due for the NFL to deal with outrageous behavior.

Simply put, it is time to return to the team sport of football.

Taunting, celebrating, trash-talking and all of the other behavior that is not productive to the game should be outlawed by the NFL, and very stiff fines, penalties and suspensions should be the order of the day.

It is high time that a touchdown produces the ball being handed to the official, and then play resuming.

Why should everyone cater to every thug, misfit and degenerate just because they can play a game?

It's time for reality to resurface.

Jack Noppinger Kingsville

Violence is ruining the sport of hockey

It is time to re-think hockey.

Is the object of the game to put a puck into the goal, or is it just an endless cycle of violence and retaliation like the drug wars on the mean streets of our cities?

If it is the former, players who fight should be thrown out of the game immediately with suspensions or even banishment to be considered and rapidly decided by league officials.

If it is the latter, do we really need this joke of a sport?

Joe Roman Baltimore

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