Charlotte's Brown to get good look at Knight

Randallstown grad, 49ers play Texas Tech in NCAAs

Postcards

Colleges

March 18, 2004|By Bill Free | Bill Free,SUN STAFF

All the usual drama and excitement of an NCAA tournament game will be in the air today when Demon Brown and his Charlotte 49ers meet Texas Tech in the first round.

Brown, a senior point guard from Randallstown High, is prepared for those moments in his third trip to the ultimate collegiate basketball show.

What he has never experienced first-hand is any of Texas Tech coach Bob Knight's infamous temper outbursts.

"We hope to make him go off with our outstanding play," Brown said. "I've never been in a game where he was coaching and it will be interesting to see him."

Today at 12:25 p.m. in the NCAA's East Rutherford Regional in Buffalo, N.Y., Brown and ninth-seeded Charlotte (21-8) will come face-to-face with Knight and eighth-seeded Texas Tech (22-10).

"My family and friends in Randallstown are excited about this game and they'll all be watching," said the 6-foot-1 Brown, who is second on the team in scoring with 12.6 points a game, leads in assists with 3.8 and is second this season in three-pointers with 72.

"They are just the opposite from us," he said of the Red Raiders. "We shoot a lot of threes and they don't. They have a 6-4 guy at power forward and we have good size up front."

Charlotte assistant coach Dee Tolliver said of Brown: "He's a warrior and has been invaluable for us. He's the brain of our team. If he plays well, we play well."

Brown enters the tournament needing only eight three-pointers to become the all-time Charlotte and Conference USA leader. He would pass former Charlotte standout Jobey Thomas, who has 346.

He also is only the second player in 49ers history to be ranked in the school's top 10 in scoring (No. 10 with 1,555 points), assists (No. 6 with 414) and steals (No. 7 with 146). Henry Williams was the first 49ers player to accomplish the feat.

Helping out Charleston

Senior guard Marcus Johnson (Annapolis) was a starter for the College of Charleston in its drive for an NCAA tournament berth that fell short with an 89-79 loss to Chattanooga in the Southern Conference tournament.

The 6-4 Johnson averaged 5.9 points, 4.7 assists and 2.1 rebounds. He shot 34.5 percent on three-pointers and 76.9 percent from the free-throw line.

Cougars freshman guard Dontayne Draper (Walbrook) was also a key contributor to the success of the Cougars (20-9). He started four games, averaging 22.1 minutes in 28 games, 5.4 points, 2.8 assists, 2.1 rebounds, and 1.4 steals. He shot 71 percent from the line.

Sowash an All-American

Freshman Haverford hurdler Aislinn Sowash (North Carroll) took third place and gained All-America honors in the 55-meter hurdles in the NCAA Division III Women's Indoor Track and Field Championships in Whitewater, Wis.

Anderson, Bojanov honored

University of Chicago senior Valerie Anderson (Dulaney) is a Division III indoor track and field All-American after finishing seventh in the 20-pound weight throw (16.01 meters) in the NCAA championships.

Chicago freshman Emil Bojanov (Dulaney) earned All-America honors in men's D-III as a member of the distance medley relay team that took seventh place (10:07.57).

Et cetera

Norfolk State freshman forward Kyle Garrison II (Lake Clifton) averaged 8.2 minutes and 1.3 points in 29 games this season for the Spartans (12-17 overall, 10-8 in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference).

Senior 6-1 guard Jeff Bright (Wilde Lake) and 6-5 freshman forward Ryan DeChant (Liberty) were reserves this season on the Franklin & Marshall basketball team that advanced to the final eight in the NCAA Division III tournament. The ninth-ranked Diplomats (26-4) lost to fifth-ranked Amherst, 82-70, in the round of eight. Bright averaged 6.8 minutes, 1.7 points and 1.0 rebounds in 21 games, and DeChant scored five points in nine games.

Have a Postcard? Contact Bill Free by e-mail at bfree7066@hotmail.com or by phone at 410-833-5349.

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