`Da Vinci Code' up next in Fulton

Book club

Howard Live

February 26, 2004

An interview with Liz Tomalis, founder of the Fulton Ladies Book Club.

Why did you start this book club? I had been in one in another state and really liked it. So I started asking people that I met socially if they would like to join one.

Who are the Fulton Ladies? We are a group of women who mostly have children at Fulton Elementary or who live in the Fulton area. We needed another outlet besides working, carpooling, kids, all that stuff.

How long have you been meeting? We started in September. At that first meeting, we laid out ground rules on how we'd choose books and how the discussion would go. We wanted to make sure that we discussed the aspects of books that we'd not normally think about and didn't just use the time to talk about other stuff that moms talk about -- kids, school, etc.

Does your club limit its selections to a specific genre? No, we limited it only to the genres that the participants were interested in. We knew we wanted to read a mystery, a classic, a humorous fiction book and a biography.

What have you read so far? The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver; Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom; The Inn at Lake Devine by Elinor Lipman; The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith; and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.

What book has your group liked most? The people who read Poisonwood Bible liked it even though it was hard to get into and it was long. Others really liked Tuesdays with Morrie.

What are you reading now? We plan to read The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown.

Do you do anything special at your meetings? We usually meet at different restaurants and, on occasion, at a member's home. Each month, a different person is the discussion facilitator.

What do you like most about being in a book club? Reading the books. Every time you read a book, it's like undertaking an adventure. Also, as the members get to know one another better, we learn more about each other as we share more personally the thoughts and feelings on what we're reading.

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