Carroll Digest

CARROLL COUNTY DIGEST

February 06, 2004

Workshops, hearings to be scheduled on zoning law changes

Revisions to Carroll County's zoning law and ordinance on subdivision standards will be considered at public workshops and hearings expected to be held in the next few months.

The county commissioners voted yesterday to forward the proposed changes for public discussion. This is the latest action in the county's efforts to revise growth laws during a yearlong freeze on residential development.

Last month, county planning director Steven C. Horn presented changes to the adequate public facilities law, and the commissioners voted to schedule a public hearing.

County Attorney Kimberly A. Millender said public workshops are expected to start this month, with the first of the public hearings to be scheduled next month.

Changes to the county's zoning law and the ordinance on development and subdivision standards mostly deal with transferring sections, removing outdated material and adding new parts.

One revision in the subdivision standards includes removing landowners' ability to transfer building rights across zoning lines.

Conditional approval given to residential development

The county commissioners signed a decision yesterday that would allow a $20 million senior development to progress if certain conditions are met.

Last month, the 162-unit Westminster Mews - proposed at Gorsuch Road and Center Street outside Westminster - was granted an exemption from the county's freeze on residential development and given a zoning waiver, as long as the development proceeds with plans for restrictive covenants.

One agreement stipulates that only medical offices are allowed on a small portion of the property that is zoned for commercial use.

County Attorney Kimberly A. Millender assured the commissioners that the project would not proceed unless the developer secures other covenants with the Carroll County Board of Education and the Church of the Open Door.

The education board is expected to consider the covenant at its meeting this month.

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