Mount falls to Monmouth in third OT

Hopkins ties points mark

Coppin gains 4th in row

State women

College Basketball

February 01, 2004|By FROM STAFF REPORTS

In a game that featured 30 lead changes, clutch free throws and a game-tying shot at the end of the second overtime, Monmouth prevailed over host Mount St. Mary's, 104-100, in three overtimes in a Northeast Conference game last night.

Monmouth took the lead for good on Niamh Dwyer's three-point play with 38 seconds remaining in the third overtime. Dwyer's layup and free throw gave the Hawks (9-8, 5-3) a 101-98 lead. Beth Foster hit a jumper for Mount St. Mary's, cutting the Monmouth advantage to one with 14 seconds left, but the Hawks hit three free throws in the final seconds and the Mountaineers' Myriam Baccouche missed a potential game-tying three-pointer with five seconds to go.

Mount St. Mary's (6-13, 5-5) twice forced extra time with free throws. Guard Samira Rashid hit two free throws with four seconds left in regulation to force overtime and assisted on Foster's layup with eight seconds left in the first overtime that tied the score at 78.

Foster finished with 28 points and 16 rebounds to lead Mount St. Mary's.

Johns Hopkins 104, Muhlenberg 73: The host Blue Jays tied a school record for points and held Division III's highest-scoring offense well below its average. Four players scored in double figures for the Blue Jays (14-2, 9-1 Centennial Conference), led by Ashanna Randall's 17 points. The Mules (13-5, 8-3), who entered the game averaging 92.2 points, hit seven of 36 shots in the first half.

Coppin State 61, Hampton 60: The visiting Lady Eagles (10-8, 6-3 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) won their fourth straight and first in eight years at Hampton's Convocation Center, beating the Lady Pirates (5-12, 5-4).

Leisel Harry finished with 16 points and 12 rebounds for Coppin State.

Loyola 62, Iona 59: The host Greyhounds (9-10, 5-5 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference) failed to make a field goal in the final 5:22, but hit seven of eight free throws down the stretch to edge the Gaels (3-15, 2-7).

Katie Scherle had 21 for Loyola.

UMBC 65, Vermont 55: The host Retrievers (1-16, 1-7 America East) shot 48.9 percent from the field in winning their first game of the season.

Four players scored in double figures for UMBC, led by Courtney Doughman, who went 5-for-8 from the field and 3-for-6 from beyond the arc and finished with 15 points. Aaron Yantzi scored 20 points for Vermont (8-8, 2-6).

Norfolk State 75, Morgan State 49: The Lady Bears (1-17, 1-8 MEAC) shot 27 percent and committed 30 turnovers and remained winless on the road. Yomika Corbitt had 18 points and 10 rebounds for the host Spartans (3-15, 2-7).

Chatham 63, College of Notre Dame 58: The host Gators (9-6, 2-3 Atlantic Women's College Conference) surrendered a 14-point halftime lead. The Cougars (2-9, 2-2) got 17 points from Tara Viti. Catherine Vecchioni scored 12 points for the Gators.

McDaniel 85, Ursinus College 41: The host Green Terror (15-2, 11-0 Centennial Conference) won its 10th straight behind 17 points from Kristy Costa.

Marymount 63, Goucher 46: The host Saints (17-2, 7-1 Capital Athletic Conference) won their sixth straight, holding the Gophers (9-8, 3-5) to 21 percent shooting in the first half. Kate Guggino scored a game-high 17 points for Goucher.

Salisbury 82, St. Mary's 74: Mary Kate Lenz scored a game-high 32 points for the Seahawks (5-13, 2-6 Capital Athletic Conference), but the host Sea Gulls (10-9, 4-4) won in overtime for their first victory in four games.

Dickinson 75, Washington College 62: The visiting Red Devils (9-6, 6-4 Centennial Conference) made 13 of 16 free throws and pulled away in the final minutes. Karen Simos hit five three-pointers and finished with 21 points for the Shorewomen (4-13, 2-10).

Frostburg State 65, Lake Erie 56: The visiting Bobcats (12-7, 4-3) picked up their fourth Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference win despite shooting 31 percent.

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