With long-range shooting, Price could leap from BCCC to Terps

State notebook

Colleges

December 18, 2003|By Bill Free | Bill Free,SUN STAFF

Shalane Price has high hopes these days.

And why not?

Anybody who can shoot 60 percent on three-point attempts can afford to dream about continuing her collegiate basketball career at the University of Maryland.

It would be quite a jump from Baltimore City Community College to a fast-improving Terps squad, but the 5-foot-7 Price is certainly building quite a resume for College Park.

The freshman guard leads all National Junior College Athletic Association Division II scorers with a 27.2-point average, and her 60.3 percent long-range shooting places her No. 1 in the nation in that category, too.

Price also can play some tough defense, averaging 4.4 steals a game for 10th place in the nation.

"I'm getting my information together right now to show Maryland," said Price, who is shooting 52 percent from the field. "I definitely want to play at that level. All my teammates like to see the ball in my hands because they know I'm going to produce for them."

Price has hit 35 of 58 three-point tries even though opponents constantly try to confuse her by switching between zone and man-to-man defenses.

"Shalane is a natural shooter with a great ability to stay focused on the court," said her coach, Vanessa Locke.

When Price was asked what has prompted her rise from a 16-point average in high school at Dunbar to 27 points, she said, "I want to win a championship."

The BCCC Red Devils are off to a 5-0 start in Maryland Junior College competition and are 7-4 overall after splitting two games last weekend in the snow-shortened Charm City Classic.

BCCC blitzed the Community College of Philadelphia, 111-34, behind 33 points by Price, but lost to Hostos (N.Y.) Community College, 84-78, despite a 34-point effort from Price.

High honor for Campbell

Johns Hopkins junior safety Matt Campbell became just the second first-team All-American in school history yesterday when he was named to the top team by the Division III sports information directors.

Campbell led the Centennial Conference with eight interceptions for the 10-1 Blue Jays, who shared the conference title for a second straight season.

Campbell also had a team-high 11 pass breakups and was tied for second on the team in tackles with 65. Campbell spearheaded a Hopkins defense that was ranked in the top five in the nation throughout the season in scoring defense and pass efficiency defense.

Campbell joins two-time first-team All-American Bill Stromberg (1980-1981).

Hopkins junior offensive tackle Matt Weeks was an honorable mention selection by the SIDs yesterday, after being chosen Tuesday as a third-team Football Gazette Division III All-American.

Et cetera

Senior tennis standout Josef Novotny has achieved the highest individual ranking in UMBC history, climbing to No. 4 in the Northeast Region in the latest Intercollegiate Tennis Association rankings.

Salisbury University senior soccer midfielder Dan Meehan became just the second first-team selection in school history to the National Soccer Coaches Association of America 12-player All-America first team. Meehan is the seventh player in Salisbury history to earn a spot on the All-America first, second or third team.

Salisbury junior linebacker Brad DeHaven is among 115 players from 69 schools selected to the 2003 CoSIDA Division III All-America football team.

Frostburg State freshman Anna Routzahn has provisionally qualified for the NCAA Division III national track and field championships in the high jump with a 5-foot, 4.25-inch leap at the West Virginia University Holiday classic. Routzahn finished second, ahead of several Division I athletes.

UMES has invited youngsters from kindergarten to eighth grade to attend four Hawks basketball games for free: Dec. 27, Dec. 30, Jan. 3 and Jan. 5.

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