Broadneck repeats in 4A

unranked Glenelg rules 2A

Centrowitz paces Bruins

Gladiators' title is first since '90

Barnes tops 3A

Girls state cross country championships

High Schools

November 09, 2003|By Edward Lee | Edward Lee,SUN STAFF

Broadneck overcame an unexpected challenge while Glenelg pulled off the unexpected.

The No. 3 Bruins held off a surprising Eleanor Roosevelt team to collect their second consecutive Class 4A girls state cross country title yesterday at Hereford High in Parkton.

Meanwhile, the unranked Gladiators shrugged off a string of runner-up performances and key injuries to pick up the Class 2A crown - the program's first state title since 1990.

With C. Milton Wright freshman Allison Barnes winning an individual championship in the Class 3A race, the Baltimore area walked away with crowns in three of the four divisions. (Area schools came up empty only in Class 1A.)

Broadneck, the favorite to repeat as 4A champion, compiled 59 points by placing five runners in the top 26. That was enough to pass an Eleanor Roosevelt program - long regarded as a powerhouse in track and field where the Raiders have dominated the sprint events - that put five runners in the top 25.

"When I saw their results in the [4A South] region, I didn't give them the credit they deserve," said Bruins coach Dana Dobbs. "They taught me a lesson today."

Broadneck was paced by senior Lauren Centrowitz, whose winning time of 19 minutes, 2 seconds over the 3-mile course made her the third area runner in the past six years to repeat as a state champion. (North Carroll's Colleen Lawson won in 1998 and 1999, and Towson's Cori Koch won in 2000 and 2001.)

Centrowitz expressed more joy at her team's accomplishment than her own.

"It wasn't anything great," Centrowitz said of her day. "I didn't do anything spectacular."

Besides Centrowitz, the Bruins received solid efforts from junior Emily Nagle (sixth place in 20:05), freshman Tait Woodward (13th, 20:57), senior Susan St. Cyr (24th, 21:43) and sophomore Kasey Jamison (26th, 21:46).

Unlike Broadneck - which lost only once to No. 2 Severna Park at the Anne Arundel County championships this fall - Glenelg won just one invitational before claiming the crown in the 2A South region.

To make matters worse for the Gladiators, they lost junior Katie Pencek before the Howard County championships to a stress fracture in her left fibula. And junior Mallory Heinke had competed in just one varsity race after nursing a stress fracture in her right foot.

Still, Roger Volrath, who coaches Glenelg with Steve Ruckert, said he wasn't worried.

"Our whole training program is set up to peak at regions and states," he said. "We told them they were still on track."

The Gladiators proved their coach right, as senior Chelsea Kapp (ninth, 21:23), junior Jessica Hibbert (11th, 21:28), Heinke (16th, 22:02), sophomore Stephanie Sones (19th, 22:15) and senior Rachel Bounds (39th, 23:27) accrued 87 points - four better than Hereford.

"That's what we've wanted to do all season," said Kapp, a lacrosse player who competed in her first season of cross country. "It's been hard, but everyone was working hard to get here."

No. 1 C. Milton Wright fell 14 points short in its bid to unseat Northwest, which grabbed its second straight 3A title with 82 points.

But the Mustangs did boast the individual champion in Barnes, who kept teammate and junior Kelli Buck (second, 20:02) and Severna Park senior Stephanie Newton (third, 20:10) at bay long enough to win in 19:47.

"I was just hoping to get on the varsity team," said Barnes, who is a competitive swimmer. "I didn't even dream about winning states."

Severna Park accrued the same number of points (96) as C. Milton Wright did, but the Mustangs won the tiebreaker as their No. 6 runner finished before the Falcons' No. 6 runner.

In 1A, Loch Raven junior Amy Blair placed seventh in 21:26, but the Raiders finished second with 65 points.

Williamsport needed just 35 points to secure its second consecutive 1A championship.

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