Deaths Elsewhere

Deaths Elsewhere

October 08, 2003

Eleanor Lambert, 100, the publicist who put American designers alongside their Paris counterparts on the fashion map, died yesterday at her Manhattan home after a brief illness.

During her decades-long career, Ms. Lambert presided over the International Best-Dressed List and helped create many of America's most important fashion institutions, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute and the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

The Indiana-born daughter of a circus advance man, Ms. Lambert was a tireless arbiter of style, phoning from an elegant desk in her midtown Manhattan office to make genteel pitches about the industry's next big thing. Even after she closed her office in her late 90s, she continued to spread the word of American designers from her Fifth Avenue apartment.

In 1943, she organized fashion shows so the press could preview designer collections in one venue, the precursor to today's New York Fashion Week.

Ms. Lambert was married to Seymour Berkson, head of International News Service and publisher of the New York Journal-American, who died in 1959.

Charles Courtney Seabrook, 94, who with his family developed a technique for freezing produce that revolutionized the food industry, died Saturday in New Jersey.

Mr. Seabrook's family ran Seabrook Farms, a 55,000-acre property in what was once the largest irrigated vegetable farm in the world.

In 1930, Mr. Seabrook, along with his father and two brothers, tried to freeze vegetables by packing them in wooden boxes with dry ice. The concept worked and led to a marketing partnership with Clarence Birdseye.

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