Extra Points

Nfl Week 5

October 06, 2003

On wrong end again

Chargers coach Marty Schottenheimer is 0-5 for the second time in three years. Two seasons ago, he started 0-5 with the Redskins, but finished 8-8, before getting fired and replaced by Steve Spurrier.

Still one short

Falcons coach Dan Reeves fell to 0-for-4 in his pursuit of career win No. 200.

Happy at new home

Panthers' Stephen Davis set an NFL record as the first running back to pass the 100-yard mark in his first four games with a new team. With 565 rushing yards, he also set a record for the most total yards with a new team.

Dallas' lucky 13

The Cowboys beat the Cardinals for the 13th straight time at home during the regular season. Winning personality

Packers' Brett Favre passed Joe Montana for fifth place on the all-time victories list with 118. Up next is Johnny Unitas with 119.

Almost top Chief

Tony Gonzalez tied Otis Taylor for second on the Chiefs career receptions list with 410.

Sack attack

Seahawks' John Randle's 133rd sack moved him into sixth place all time.

TONIGHTS GAME

Indianapolis (4-0) at Tampa Bay (2-1)

Time: 9

TV: Chs. 2, 7

Line: Bucs by 4

Players to watch: Colts' Peyton Manning leads NFL with nine TD passes. Bucs' Simeon Rice has four sacks.

The buzz: If a Bucs extra point hadn't been blocked against Carolina, this would be a battle of the unbeatens. It remains a possible Super Bowl preview, as Colts coach Tony Dungy visits his old team. Dungy has rebuilt the Colts' defense, but the one he left behind is likely to contain Manning and company.

- Chicago Tribune

NEXT WEEK

Carolina (4-0) at Indianapolis (4-0)

The Colts and surprising Panthers have two of the best defenses in the league, but Indianapolis also boasts one of the top offenses.

Philadelphia (2-2) at Dallas (3-1)

The Eagles, who knocked Washington out of first place in the NFC East yesterday, will try to do the same thing to the Cowboys, who have won three straight.

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