Deaths Elsewhere

Deaths Elsewhere

July 29, 2003

Vance Hartke, 84, a former U.S. senator and liberal Indiana Democrat whose staunch opposition to the Vietnam War put him at odds with President Lyndon B. Johnson, died of heart failure Sunday at a Northern Virginia hospital.

Mr. Hartke, who set up a law practice in Falls Church, Va., after he was defeated for re-election in 1976, had undergone open-heart surgery three years ago.

He was the mayor of Evansville, Ind., when he was first elected to the Senate in 1958. He was soon befriended by Johnson, the party's majority leader, who awarded him choice assignments.

Mr. Hartke used his chairmanship of Commerce's transportation subcommittee to make automakers equip cars with seat belts and other safety equipment, and helped establish Amtrak and Conrail. He also was instrumental in creating the International Executive Service Corps, an organization modeled after the Peace Corps that sent retired U.S. businessmen to poor countries to help turn small businesses into large ones.

The split with Johnson occurred in 1965, when Mr. Hartke aligned himself with other Senate Democrats opposed to the Vietnam War. The group included J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota and George McGovern of South Dakota.

Mr. Hartke's opposition to Vietnam later earned him a spot on Richard Nixon's enemies list. He lost his Senate seat in 1976 to Republican Richard Lugar.

Mr. Hartke also had his share of political problems. In 1994, he was indicted by a grand jury in Indiana for alleged misdemeanor polling violations in connection with a successful campaign to allow riverboat casinos in Dearborn County. As part of a plea agreement, he was given a six-month suspended sentence.

J. Wilson Newman, 93, a former chairman and chief executive of Dun & Bradstreet, died July 8 in Charlottesville, Va.

Mr. Newman joined R.G. Dun Co. as a credit reporter in 1931. Dun merged with its major competitor, John M. Bradstreet Co., in 1933, and the combined company began operating under the new name in 1939.

He was named a vice president in 1946, president in 1952, and chairman and chief executive in 1960. He joined Dun's finance committee when he retired in 1968, and remained a member for 12 years.

During Mr. Newman's tenure, Dun acquired several companies, including R.H. Donnelley, a publisher of the Yellow Pages and trade magazines, and Moody's Investors Service. Dun has since spun off both companies.

He was a member of the U.S. Price Commission, which addressed price gouging, in 1971 and 1972, and of the Commission on Bankruptcy Laws from 1970 to 1973.

Trevor Nelson, 34, a producer for the CBS television program 60 Minutes, died Thursday at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston of complications from meningitis.

The New York City resident produced reports for correspondent Steve Kroft during the past three years, including segments on security issues after the attacks Sept. 11, 2001. He also produced the first interview with teen-age stock manipulator Jonathan Lebed. Many of the segments he produced led the program.

He was born in New York and in 1991 earned a bachelor's degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. He joined CBS News in the Washington office of 60 Minutes as an associate producer in 1996 and moved to New York in 1998. Before that he worked for Monitor Radio in Boston.

Erik Braunn, 52, the Iron Butterfly guitarist who played one of rock's most recognizable riffs in the 17-minute anthem "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida," died of cardiac arrest Friday in Los Angeles.

Mr. Braunn, who was born in Pekin, Ill., and raised in Los Angeles, was a violin prodigy who began his musical career at age 4. He joined Iron Butterfly at 16 and toured with the heavy metal band from 1967 to 1969, when the group was enjoying its greatest success.

He, Doug Ingle, Ron Bushy and Lee Dorman left their mark on musical history with the psychedelic "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida," released in 1968. It went platinum and stayed on the national sales chart for two years.

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