Aubrey C. `Mac' McCall, 77, W.R. Grace & Co. executive

March 27, 2003

Aubrey Cleveland McCall, a retired executive with W.R. Grace & Co., a global chemical and materials company, died of complications from heart disease Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 77.

Mr. McCall, who lived in the city's Northwood neighborhood, retired from W.R. Grace in 1977 as vice president of its agricultural chemicals group.

Born in Hagerstown and known as "Mac," he was raised in Cambridge and served in the Navy from 1943 to 1946. He trained to become a pilot, but never flew for the Navy because the war ended, said his son, Bruce McCall of Towson.

While in the service, Mr. McCall attended Milligan College in Tennessee and the University of Oklahoma. He played basketball and football at both, and later at the University of Maryland, where he graduated in 1948 from its business school. In 1971, he graduated from the Harvard Business School's advanced management program.

Mr. McCall joined Grace in 1948, working in sales, production and general management assignments in Indiana, Ohio and Missouri before settling in Baltimore in 1956.

During his career, he traveled in much of Asia, Europe, Australia and the Middle East, and saw nearly all 50 states.

He also traveled for pleasure with his wife of 50 years, the former Barbara Barnett, who died in 1996.

"He always believed the measure of a man was how he treated people he didn't have to be nice to," his son said.

Mr. McCall was a member of the Center Club, Merchants Club and Homeland Racquet Club, and of Grace United Methodist Church in Baltimore, where services were held yesterday.

He is also survived by three daughters, Sharon Stulting of Atlanta, Sharli Schultz of Succasunna, N.J., and Candace Millard of Stoneleigh; another son, Michael McCall of Towson; two sisters, Agnes Jane Willis and Mildred Phelps, both of Atlanta; and 12 grandchildren. A third son, Mark McCall, died in 1997.

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